Mondo Video


Mondo video

In the old days it was toasters and blenders. Now, it's videotapes.

The kudzu-like spread of video cassette recorders has indirectly led to the growing popularity of videotapes as bank premiums. This is not to say that customers opening a jumbo CD or applying for a home equity loan will be able to take home a video of "Nightmare on Elm Street Part Five" or "The Three Stooges Festival." Instead, banks and thrifts are offering independent video productions aimed specifically at certain categories of customers--senior citizens being an especial favorite.

Planning ahead. The graying of America has placed new-found emphasis on retirement planning. Enter The Ernst & Young/Kiplinger Guide to Retirement Security, a 55-minute videotape and guidebook package from Conrad Productions, McLean, Va.

The videotape reviews the various aspects of retirement planning--pension plans, Social Security, reverse mortgages--and interviews both financial experts and retirees on their approaches to the subject. This is Conrad Productions' second financially-related video for banks; last year it released The Arthur Young/Changing Times Guide to Personal Finance, an overview of financial planning strategies.

Chase Manhattan Bank, New York, believes the retirement security video will encourage customers to think about retirement savings products. Bank spokesman Ken Mills explains that anyone who takes out a certificate of deposit of at least $5,000, either as part of an individual retirement account or as a regular CD, will receive the retirement video.

Mills says this incentive is more effective than, say, offering a retirement planning seminar. "A videotape is something people can take home and play. It's more convenient than coming to a seminar since you can do it right in your own home."

Mills' view is supported by Michael Smith, director of advertising at United Carolina Bank, Whiteville, N.C., which is planning to use the Ernst & Young/Kiplinger video. "We're about to introduce a new product aimed at the mature market and we've been looking at something that would tie in with that market."

United Carolina's new product, a seniors' program called Diamond Banking, is available to customers age 50 and older. Smith believes that the videotape's focus on retirement planning should "be a good vehicle to offer to the younger end of the mature market." However, as of this writing, the bank is in the process of deciding how to market the videotape.

"We feel the videotape has considerable value," says Smith. "So we're a little leery of just saying `Make a deposit and you get this premium.' We feel the video has more value than that."

Invitation to the dance. Some senior banking programs put the subject of financial health on hold and offer a video that stresses physical health.

Thomas & Partners Co., Inc., a Westport, Conn., marketing firm specializing in the mature market, is offering banks the Dancin' Grannies Video Exercise Program, a 50-minute program of low impact aerobics. The videotape stars the Dancin' Grannies, a 10-woman aerobics dance group from Arizona ranging in age from 55 to 68. Mark Cooper at Cleveland's Society Bank believes that this type of production fits perfectly into the bank's Prime Advantage seniors program. "It adds to what we're trying to do in terms of life-style enhancements," says Cooper, a senior vice-president.

Cooper says he is still debating whether to sell the tapes "in-branch or through the mail. I'm working my way through the logistics of having thousands of videos lying around."

Society Bank is also co-sponsoring in-person appearances by the Dancin' Grannies at three Seniors' Expos to be held in Ohio this summer.

Another financial institution offering the exercise videotape, Norwalk (Conn. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Mondo Video
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.