Awards &Amp; Prizes

American Theatre, September 2002 | Go to article overview

Awards &Amp; Prizes


On the heels of the Tonys, which capped a crowded awards season June 2, the 58th Annual Theatre World Awards honored new performers from the past season's Broadway and Off-Broadway productions. The Theatre World committee of writers and critics celebrated the debuts of Justin Bohon (Oklahoma!), Simon Callow (The Mystery of Charles Dickens), Mos Def (Topdog/Underdog), Emma Fielding and Adam Godley (both for Private Lives), Martin Jarvis (By Jeeves), Spencer Kayden (Urinetown), Gretchen Mol (The Shape of Things), Anna Paquin (The Glory of Living), Louise Pitre (Mamma Mia), David Warner (Major Barbara) and Rachel Weisz (The Shape of Things).

In hot pursuit, New York's Off-Off Broadway Review closed the Big Apple's awards season with the eighth annual OOBR Awards in late June. Honorees included the requisite Shakespearean revamps (including the Willful Company's Hamlet, New Perspective's Taming of the Shrew and Love Creek Productions' Much Ado About Nothing) as well as brand new fare (including Lesbian Pulp-o-Rama!, created by On the Verge Theatre Company). A special achievement award went to Untitled Theater Company #61's David and Edward Einhorn (producing and artistic director respectively) for mounting the Ionesco Theatre Festival last year.

Playwright/director/actor David Greenspan pocketed $50,000 as a 2002 recipient of the Alpert Award in the Arts, presented by California Institute of the Arts and funded by the Herb Alpert Foundation. Greenspan's works include The Myopia, an epic burlesque of tragic proportion, Dead Mother and Principia. Given annually, the Alpert award provides five fellowships to early-mid-career artists in dance, film/video, music, visual arts and theatre.

The Shakespeare Guild of Washington, D.C., bestowed its sixth Sir John Gielgud Award for Excellence in the Dramatic Arts on Kevin Kline, the first American to garner the citation. At a ceremony presided over by Tony Randall and John Cleese, Kline joined the ranks of esteemed Bardic Brits Dame Judi Dench and Sir Ian McKellan, among others.

The National Arts Journalism Program awarded fellowships to 15 arts and cultural journalists for the 2002-03 academic year, including senior fellowships--with stipends of $10,000 a month during their residencies--to theatre critics Robert Brustein and Margo Jefferson. Brustein's writing project will culminate with a history of American Repertory Theatre, in Cambridge, Mass., while Jefferson joins forces with Elizabeth Kendall, author and adjunct professor at Bard College, to create a photo/text panorama of American women artists.

The Margo Jones Medal, administered by the Lawrence and Lee Theatre Research Institute at Ohio State University, went to Mel Gussow for his commitment to new work in the theatre. Gussow, a cultural writer for the New York Times as well as the author of numerous books about theatre, received the medal at a ceremony held in July at the Eugene O'Neill Theater Center in Waterford, Conn.

Fourteen Philadelphia-based artists reaped 12 Pew Fellowships in the Arts, administered by the University of the Arts and funded-with a stipend of $50,000 going to each--by Pew Charitable Trusts. Among those honored were performance artists Whit MacLaughlin, Caden Manson, Thaddeus McWhinnie Phillips and, in the first-ever collaboration to receive a fellowship, Gabriel Quinn Bauriedel, Dan Rothenberg and Dito van Reigersberg, co-founders of the Pig Iron Theatre. …

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