Distance No Object, Log on and the World's Your Oyster; INTERNET: Community-Based Websites Growing in Popularity

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), August 28, 2002 | Go to article overview

Distance No Object, Log on and the World's Your Oyster; INTERNET: Community-Based Websites Growing in Popularity


Byline: TONY TRAINOR

THE traditional boundaries of communities are being extended as expatriates take an active part in the daily life of their home towns and villages.

It's just one aspect of the increasing use of the internet by millions of web surfers whose first port of call is their home from home on the world wide web.

Many of these virtual visitors appear to take an active part in the comings and goings of communities they may not even have seen since childhood.

And the point is fast approaching where a planning application to demolish an old chapel in Mid Wales might prompt an angry e-mail of objection to the local authority from an irate cyber surfer as far away as California.

The village of Llay in North Wales has an award-winning website known as LlayOnline (www.llay82.freeserve.co.uk). Its hit counter shows that more than 12,600 visits have been made to the site, which boasts an impressive world map enabling far-flung Llayites across the world to mark their location and send a message home.

This is quite a popularity rating for a mining village that didn't exist before 1922.

LlayOnline is even ranked number five in broadcaster Simon Mayo's top 10 community websites for BBC Radio Five Live - probably a tribute to its clever search engine ranking.

RossettOnline in Wrexham is another example of a website giving community events listings in a standard format. Its clarity has earned at least four web design awards.

A glance at the guest book indicates how the web is opening windows on the world.

A message from ``Jeanette'' in Laramie, Wyoming, wrote, ``What a great little website. I met someone from your little village in a chat room and he wanted me to check it out... looks like a really cool hamlet.''

The demand for faster internet access, more efficient modes of one-toone communication and conferencing have led to most community websites incorporating some form of chat room or, at the very least, a message board or discussion forum.

It is here that regulars mingle in cyberspace to check out the latest gossip, often about their local authority and its councillors.

The overwhelming success of AberdareOnline, the Cynon valley website, is largely due to its extensive range of local photography as well as a stormy message board, which enables discussion on topics like local government, genealogy, music and sport.

The site features an exceptional section on Cynon Valley history and an up-to-date list of local events. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Distance No Object, Log on and the World's Your Oyster; INTERNET: Community-Based Websites Growing in Popularity
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.