Schama Leads the New Rock'n'roll. (History)

By Fielding-Smith, Abbie | New Statesman (1996), August 19, 2002 | Go to article overview

Schama Leads the New Rock'n'roll. (History)


Fielding-Smith, Abbie, New Statesman (1996)


Antony Beevor's war tomes Stalingrad and Berlin have been selling like Elastoplast at Agincourt. David Starkey earned [pounds sterling]75,000 an episode for his last Channel 4 series, and Simon Schama topped them all this month with a multimedia deal for [pounds sterling]3m. The super-historians have arrived.

Not that there is anything new about best-selling history. Scott Pack, product buying manager for Waterstone's, argues that although cross-media tie-ins have recently created some high-profile authors, history has been one of the shop's most popular subjects for a long time.

Pack's description of his readers' purchasing patterns is revealing. A customer will come in and buy A History of Britain because of the TV programme, and often return to buy more books on whichever period interests them, eventually buying relatively obscure authors as their interests specialise: the origins of the British navy, say, or women in Victorian England. Just like research students -- except that their research costs them [pounds sterling]30 a pop.

Yet despite its recent success, which has led to a 40 per cent increase in university applications to study history, a professional historian in the UK still faces a meagre salary, tough competition and lack of status. Starter salaries for lecturing or teaching posts are still about [pounds sterling]16,000. The Arts and Humanities Research Board is struggling to give 20 per cent of its (mostly First-class Oxbridge) applicants awards for postgraduate research, despite a decline in applications. These conditions have led to a brain drain to America that includes not only Simon Schama, but also Richard Tuck, Anthony Pagden and Jay Winter.

Universities UK, which represents vice-chancellors around the country, recently made the case to the government that history is now financially useful to the state: the British Tourist Authority said that last year, despite the foot-and-mouth outbreak, earnings from visits to historical sites rose 4 per cent, hitting a record [pounds sterling]280m. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Schama Leads the New Rock'n'roll. (History)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.