Statement of Purpose

The Future of Children, Summer-Fall 2002 | Go to article overview

Statement of Purpose


The primary purpose of The Future of Children is to promote effective policies and programs for children. The journal is intended to provide policymakers, service providers, and the media with timely, objective information based on the best available research regarding major issues related to child well-being. It is designed to complement, not duplicate, the kind of technical analysis found in academic journals and the general coverage of children's issues by the popular press and special interest groups.

This issue of the journal focuses on youth gun violence in the United States, examining the impact of such violence upon children, families, and communities, and exploring policies that aim to reduce gun deaths and injuries to children and youth. More than 20,000 people under age 20 are killed or injured by firearms in the United States each year. Gun violence is the second leading cause of death to young people ages 10 to 19 in the United States, and it imposes significant economic and psychological costs upon society. Therefore, keeping children and youth safe from gun violence and restricting young people's unsupervised access to guns should be key priorities for legislators, law enforcement, public health practitioners, educators, and parents alike.

The articles presented here summarize the knowledge and research about how gun violence affects children and youth, and which policies hold promise for reducing youth gun violence. …

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