The Nuclear Family's Fast Becoming a Social Freak; Research Paints Bleak Picture of a Nation of Single Adults Living Alone

By Brocklebank, Jonathan | Daily Mail (London), August 30, 2002 | Go to article overview

The Nuclear Family's Fast Becoming a Social Freak; Research Paints Bleak Picture of a Nation of Single Adults Living Alone


Brocklebank, Jonathan, Daily Mail (London)


Byline: JONATHAN BROCKLEBANK

THE nuclear family is in its death throes, according to new research.

In just over a decade, the number of Scottish households consisting of two adults and children will halve - while singleperson households will increase dramatically.

The Scottish Executive projection for 2014 paints a picture of a nation in which the traditional family is the exception rather than the rule.

Only 11 per cent of households will be occupied by families, while almost four in ten will consist of one adult living alone.

The findings were last night greeted with dismay by church leaders, who said they highlighted both the decline of two- parent families and the vast numbers of elderly people who will be left living on their own.

They also raise the possibility of serious housing shortages, more homelessness and spiralling property prices in some areas.

Many councils may need intensive house- building programmes to cope with the changing market.

The Household Projections for Scotland report predicts the total number of households will increase by 12 per cent, from 2.2million in 2000 to 2.46million in 2014.

West and East Lothian face the largest projected increases, of 24 and 22 per cent respectively.

Dundee City is the only area predicted to see a fall, of 5 per cent.

But this increase in the number of households will happen as the overall population falls slightly.

The next 12 years will see huge increases in all household types, except those consisting of two or more adults with at least one child.

Such homes currently account for one in five households in Scotland, but by 2014 that figure is expected to drop to one in ten.

There will be a 32 per cent increase in the number of properties housing one single adult, a 30 per cent increase in households containing one adult and one or more children, and a 15 per cent increase in households with two or more adults and no children.

The figures also show children will feature in a decreasing proportion of households. By 2014, less than one-fifth will be home to children.

Aberdeen will remain the singles capital of Scotland. Already 46 per cent of all households in the city are occupied by single adults. In 12 years this will have risen to 52 per cent.

Experts attribute the changes to several factors, including a higher divorce rate, the trend for marrying later and increased life expectancy among the elderly. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Nuclear Family's Fast Becoming a Social Freak; Research Paints Bleak Picture of a Nation of Single Adults Living Alone
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.