Editorial

By Goddard, Horace I. | Kola, Winter 2000 | Go to article overview

Editorial


Goddard, Horace I., Kola


Kola has reached another milestone on its literary journey. The magazine is found in many universities in Canada, the United States of America, Africa, Germany and the West Indies. In the Montreal area, elementary and high schools also subscribe to it.

The context of the journey is relevant to the writings in the magazine since the journey/travel/voyage is a conventional trope evident in Black post-colonial writing. Consistent with this theme is the search for a home, real or paradisiacal, in this writing. There is a particular interest in how contemporary Black writers in Canada negotiate 'home' within the framework of alien spaces and signifiers.

The examination of the meaning of the journey is two-fold. First, it relates to the search for 'self within the polemics of self-knowledge and liberation. Second, it is relevant to the context of movement from one geographical location to another in search of a place to call home. There is also the metaphorical immanence of travel consistent with the marginalization of the individual and the conditions of rootedness within a particular geographical space. The journey, then, inevitably centres around the historical as well as psychological dimensions of deracination, orientation, disorientation and reorientation.

In many respects Black Canadian writing underpins many aspects of the dialectics of travel. H. Nigel Thomas's novel, Spirits in the Dark, explores varying strands of the journey. Jerome, its hero, seeks to understand his place within a hostile West Indian environment that ignores his homoerotic identity. Thomas challenges literary traditions by putting the topic in the forefront of a discourse on homosexuality. …

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