More UNF Women Hold Top Jobs but Report Finds Low Racial Mix

By Kormanik, Beth | The Florida Times Union, September 11, 2002 | Go to article overview

More UNF Women Hold Top Jobs but Report Finds Low Racial Mix


Kormanik, Beth, The Florida Times Union


Byline: Beth Kormanik, Times-Union staff writer

The state's 11 public universities are trying to hire more women and minorities for faculty and top administrative jobs, but men and whites continue to dominate these positions, according to a Florida Department of Education report.

Also, men tend to hold most full professorships, the highest-ranking faculty jobs, with the numbers evening out in the junior faculty positions, the report showed.

The University of North Florida in Jacksonville led all state universities in gender equity in senior-level administration. Almost 55 percent of senior-level administrators were women, the only school to have females in the majority. The university was third statewide in the percent of women in academic administration and fifth in faculty.

The numbers at UNF are not so encouraging with regard to race. Whites were the overwhelming majority, filling 86.8 percent of jobs in senior-level administration, 10th overall statewide. Whites held 83.6 percent of academic administration jobs at UNF, but the school had the second-largest percent of African-Americans in academic administration, at 11.5 percent.

William Harvey, the American Council on Education's vice president and director of the office of minorities and higher education, had not seen the Florida report but said the trends mirror the picture nationwide.

"We say that diversity and providing a broad spectrum of ideas is important. In our hiring and promotional patterns, it seems one group seems to have more opportunity and gain higher-status positions," Harvey said.

The state-mandated Equity Progress Report tracks university hiring by race and gender in three categories: senior-level administration, academic administration, and faculty. It also lists each university's goals for recruiting and hiring more women and minorities.

Boards of trustees are required to consider the goals when evaluating university presidents and administrators.

The numbers for 2001-2002 show mixed progress from the previous year. The percentage of African-American senior-level and academic administrators rose, but women lost ground in these categories. Women, Hispanics and other minorities are a larger percentage of faculty members, but the percentage of African-Americans declined.

Florida A&M University, a historically black school, led all schools in the most African-American administrators and faculty, and Florida International University in Miami had the largest percentage of Hispanic administrators and faculty. …

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