Coming Together Project Seeks to Improve Race Relations Nationwide. (Cities Promoting Racial Equality)

By Wright, Gwen | Nation's Cities Weekly, September 9, 2002 | Go to article overview

Coming Together Project Seeks to Improve Race Relations Nationwide. (Cities Promoting Racial Equality)


Wright, Gwen, Nation's Cities Weekly


The National League of Cities (NLC) remains committed to helping local elected officials reduce racial and ethnic tensions. By providing resources, to include, research, publications, and seminars; NLC seeks to strengthen the capacity of local officials on key issues. In this series of articles leading up to Race Equality Week September 23-29, cities will be given an opportunity to share their accomplishments and ongoing efforts to reduce racism and achieve racial justice in their cities.

Community efforts to highlight diversity and enhance racial relations in Akron, Ohio, have grown into a national organization with a role in race relations across the country,

Coming Together USA, previously known as the Coming Together Project, is a diverse community based organization dedicated to the principles that every individual has equal worth, that promoting an appreciation for diversity will build a strong sense of community and, that bringing people together through creative innovative mechanisms will ensure racial harmony and cultural awareness.

Coming Together grew out of a year-long, in-depth series on race relations published by the Akron Beacon Journal in 1993. It was a grim retelling of the disparity of opportunity and treatment between blacks and whites in housing, employment, the criminal justice system and education. The stories clearly showed that our community had not continued to progress toward equality and the development of personal relationships in the 30 years since Martin Luther King Jr. led the civil rights movement.

Before the final stories were printed, dozens of organizations came forward in response to a call from the newspaper. They wanted to find ways to bridge the differences between the races. When the newspaper completed the series, Coming Together had more than 60 civic, social, religious and educational organizations on beard. In 1995, Coming Together was chartered as a tax-exempt, non-profit corporation. Today, approximately 215 organizations and 35 individuals representing business, civic, social, religions and educational institutions belong to the Coming Together Project. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Coming Together Project Seeks to Improve Race Relations Nationwide. (Cities Promoting Racial Equality)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.