D.C. Is Not a One-Party town.(LETTERS)

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), September 15, 2002 | Go to article overview

D.C. Is Not a One-Party town.(LETTERS)


Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Tuesday's Page 1 article, "Local primary contests tighten" stated: "Whoever captures the [Democratic mayoral] primary will be, at least for now, the de facto winner of the Nov. 5 general election: No Republican candidate has come forward." The last part of that sentence is false.

Given The Washington Times' near-absolute refusal to even mention Republican candidates running for mayor, it appears, at least for now, that The Times has, de facto, endorsed Democrat Anthony A. Williams for mayor.

Three Republican candidates came forward. Two of them, Robert Pittman and Todd Zirkle, attended our Republican mayoral meet-the-candidates forum held at the Capitol Hill Club on Sept. 6. Despite the press coverage blackout and short notice, more than two dozen Republican voters peppered Mr. Pittman and Mr. Zirkle with questions concerning issues such as repealing the District's Draconian gun ban, closing the Department of Motor Vehicle inspection station in favor of private inspection stations, working to meet our community's commitment to the poor and homeless, and D.C. statehood. Both longtime residents of the city exhibited a very respectable command of the issues. …

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