Some Tea and Wine May Cause Cancer

Nutrition Health Review, Fall 1990 | Go to article overview

Some Tea and Wine May Cause Cancer


Some Tea And Wine May Cause Cancer

Evidence from around the world shows a correlation between tannin, an ingredient found in tea, and cancer of the esophagus. For those who have given up coffee to seek comfort in the harmlessness of tea, the news can be upsetting.

A researcher has devoted more than 24 years collecting evidence that tannins, compounds of plant origin found in tea and red wine, can cause cancer of the esophagus (the muscle-membrane gullet that extends from the pharynx to the stomach).

Tannins have strong chemical power. In larger quantities they are used to tan leather.

Julia Morton, a botanist on the staff of University of Miami, has identified a suspected link to cancer of the throat among native inhabitants of Africa (the Bantus), and the populations of Curacao and other Caribbean islands who were known to use plants in the making of tea.

She collected these plants, had them tested by the National Cancer Institute and concluded that at least three plants implicated contained tannin.

Tannin, like caffeine and nicotine, provides plants with defenses against insects and other predators. She also identified tannin in sorghum, a tropical grass that both the people of Bantu Africa and those of Curacao used as part of their food supply. Coincidentally, Morton discovered high rates of cancer of the esophagus among both populations. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Some Tea and Wine May Cause Cancer
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.