Travel: Canada's Hidden Delights; There Is More to the Canadian Province of Prince Edward Island Than Anne of Green Gables, Discovers Ashley Broadley. There Are 30 Scenic Golf Courses for a Start

The Birmingham Post (England), September 21, 2002 | Go to article overview

Travel: Canada's Hidden Delights; There Is More to the Canadian Province of Prince Edward Island Than Anne of Green Gables, Discovers Ashley Broadley. There Are 30 Scenic Golf Courses for a Start


Byline: Ashley Broadley

'You have the Queen, wehave Anne of Green Gables,' a local proudly told me just hours after arriving on Prince Edward Island, Canada's smallest province. It was a worrying start to my visit of three provinces on the east coast of Canada which, along with PEI, included New Brunswick and Nova Scotia.

I had not read the book about orphan Anne Shirley and did not fancy having a picture of the smiling ginger-haired youngster thrust in my face at every opportunity.

Worry turned to anxiety when I was given complimentary passes to that evening's performance of Anne of Green Gables - The Musical. Surely this tiny island had more to offer than a fictitious 11-year-old who first appeared in a series of novels, based in PEI, by LM Montgomery in 1908?

It does, as I discovered, but not until after finding myself shocked at how much I enjoyed Anne of Green Gables - The Musical.

Prince Edward Island was the birthplace of Canada. In Charlottetown the founders met in 1864 to discuss the concept of a country called Canada. There is not a scrap of paper which can prove that the founders of this vast country made the decision during the meeting.

But the newspaper cuttings and one photograph of these eminent men with their rather large beards outside Province House in Charlottetown are proof enough for me.

A tour round Province House, which is still used as a base for local government, gives a fascinating insight into how the founders worked - and partied - during their discussions.

More interesting is Founders' Hall, which uses the modern media to tell the story of how Canada began in PEI, and manages to make history appeal to those who may normally find it boring.

Also worth a visit are the superb bays and dunes on the eastern tip of the island, which boast wonderful landscapes, beaches, trails and fishing ports. The sea is an important part of the way of life for the islanders, and lovers of sea food will be in paradise. The lobster suppers at the restaurants on the island are messy, fun and delicious.

And after dinner, there are several bars to enjoy a drink, where for the adventurous there is the local dark beer brewed on PEI.

Of course, for fans of Anne of Green Gables, there is the house where LM Montgomery based her books along with many, many gift shops.

To leave PEI - and golf fans could find it hard with 30 scenic courses to test the handicap - I drove over the impressive 13km Confederation Bridge to New Brunswick, where the next stop was Saint John, a bustling industrial town in the south of the province.

One amazing attraction in the town's harbour is the Reversing Falls.

Twice each day the powerful tides of the Bay of Fundy push the 450-mile long St John River back for a period of several hours.

The intensity, speed and volume of the water displaced in the bay creates an amazing sight.

And it's even more amazing when you go through the Reversing Falls in a powerboat driven by a Canadian who takes great pleasure in getting you soaked.

A two-hour drive from Saint John is the Fundy Trail. Along with Anne of Green Gables, nature trails are not high on my list of must-see attractions. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Travel: Canada's Hidden Delights; There Is More to the Canadian Province of Prince Edward Island Than Anne of Green Gables, Discovers Ashley Broadley. There Are 30 Scenic Golf Courses for a Start
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.