Book Reviews: Growing Up under the Rule of Hitler

The News Letter (Belfast, Northern Ireland), September 23, 2002 | Go to article overview

Book Reviews: Growing Up under the Rule of Hitler


Byline: Carol Evans

THIS trilogy is a largely biographical account of how Anna and her family flee Nazi Germany in 1933, travelling to Switzerland, then France and on to England. In London during the Blitz, Anna is seen as an "enemy alien".

After the war, she returns to Berlin as her mother is very ill and it is here Anna must face the demons of her past.

The first book of the series, When Hitler Stole Pink Rabbit, begins with Anna, a Jewish nine-year-old, suddenly becoming aware, but with no understanding as to why, the country of her birth is changing.

Her father, a well-known writer, disappears and Anna and her brother Max find themselves being rushed out of Germany by their mother in the utmost secrecy, journeying to Switzerland where the whole family are reunited once again.

Things are moving too fast for Anna and she cannot comprehend what is happening around her.

Bombs on Aunt Daisy, previously The Other Way Round, is the second of the trilogy and Anna, now a teenager, is finding life more difficult than most people during the Blitz, being viewed as an "enemy alien".

The threat of Hitler invading and the knowledge that the bombs falling on London are coming from the country of her birth, are disturbing for Anna and she wonders whether she and her beloved family will survive the onslaught.

In the third of the series, A Small Person Far Away, Anna has grown into a happily-married English woman and the war is, at last, over. …

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