TAPES Conference on Income Taxation. (Conferences)

NBER Reporter, Summer 2002 | Go to article overview

TAPES Conference on Income Taxation. (Conferences)


The NBER and the U.K.'s Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS) jointly sponsored this year's TransAtlantic Public Economics Seminar (TAPES). The May 15-17 conference, held at the Institute's London offices, focused on income taxation. The program, organized jointly by Richard Blundell, IFS, and Roger Gordon, NBER and the University of California, San Diego, was:

Helmuth Cremer, University of Toulouse, and Jean-Marie Lozachmeur and Pierre Pestieau, Liege University, "Social Security, Retirement, and Optimal Income Taxation"

Discussants: Antonio Rangel, NBER and Stanford University, and Orazio Attanasio, NBER and University College, London

Ravi Kanbur, Cornell University, and Matti Tuomala, Tampere University, "Understanding the Evolution of Inequality During Transition: The Optimal Income Taxation Framework"

Discussants: Hans-Werner Sinn, NBER and University of Munich, and James P. Ziliak, University of Oregon

Austan Goolsbee, NBER and University of Chicago, "The Impact and Inefficiency of the Corporate Income Tax: Evidence from State Organizational Form Data"

Discussants: William M. Gentry, NBER and Columbia University, and Roger H. Gordon

Ian Preston, University College, London, and Laura Blow, IFS, "Deadweight Loss and Self-Employment"

Discussants: Martin Feldstein, NBER and Harvard University, and Austan Goolsbee

William M. Gentry, and R. Glenn Hubbard, President's Council of Economic Advisers, "Taxes and Job Search"

Discussants: Bertil Holmlund, Uppsala University, and James M. Poterba, NBER and MIT

Jan Boone and Lans Bovenberg, Tilburg University, "The Optimal Taxation of Unskilled Labor with Job Search and Social Assistance"

Discussants: Bruce D. Meyer, NBER and Northwestern University, and Li Gan, University of Texas, Austin

Per Engstrom, Bertil Holmlund, and Ann-Sofie Koim, Uppsala University, "Optimal Taxation in Search Equilibrium with Home Production"

Discussants: Helmuth Cremer, and Ian Walker, University of Warwick

Emmanuel Saez, NBER and Harvard University, "Do Taxpayers Bunch at Kink Points?"

Discussants: Costas Meghir, IFS, and Ian Preston

Bruce D. Meyer, and Bradley T. Heim, Northwestern University, "Work Costs and Nonconvex in Preferences in the Estimation of Labor Supply Models"

Discussants: Richard Blundell, and Soren Blomquist, Uppsala University

Don Fullerton, NBER and University of Texas, Austin, and Li Gan, University of Texas, Austin, "A Simulation-Based Welfare Loss Calculation for Taxes on Labor Supply with Piecewise-Linear Budget Constraints"

Discussants: Jerry A. Hausman, NBER and MIT, and Emmanuel Saez

Mike Brewer; Alan Duncan, University of Nottingham; and Maria Jose Suarez, University of Oviedo; "Did the Working Families' Tax Credit Work? Analyzing Programme Participation"

Discussants: Lans A. Bovenberg and Ravi Kambur

James P. Ziliak; Thomas J. Knieser, Center for Policy Research, Syracuse University; and Douglas Holtz-Eakin, NBER and Syracuse University, "The Effect of Income Taxation on Consumption and Labor Supply: New Implications for the Optimal Income Tax"

Discussants: Tim Besley, and Thomas E. MaCurdy, NBER and Stanford University

It is often argued that implicit taxation on continued activity of elderly workers is responsible for the widely observed trend towards early retirement In a world of laissez-faire or of first-best efficiency, there would be no such implicit taxation. Cremer, Lozachmeur, and Pestieau note that when first-best redistributive instruments are not available, because some variables are not observable, the optimal policy implies a distortion of the retirement decision. Consequently, the inducement of early retirement may be part of the optimal tax-transfer policy. The authors consider a model in which individuals differ in their productivity and their capacity to work long; workers choose both their weekly labor supply and their age of retirement. …

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