Art Notes: The Fauves Invade the Academy

By Bruce, Donald | Contemporary Review, September 2002 | Go to article overview

Art Notes: The Fauves Invade the Academy


Bruce, Donald, Contemporary Review


Masters of Colour from Derain to Kandinsky, an exhibition which continues until 17 November at the Royal Academy, offers a rare chance to see pictures from the Merzbacher Collection, notable for its paintings by the Fauves and their associates. The Impressionists established the principle that colour is not absolute but relative to the time of the day, the light cast by the weather, and the radiance of adjacent tints. The Fauves took relativity further: colour was what they decreed it to be according to their decorative purpose and the inner weather of their moods. They shunned the Impressionists' hazy unemphatic diffusion of colour. The colours they preferred were so vivid that their quizzical mentor Eugene Carriere once asked them how, if they painted a parrot, they would make it stand out against its background. The use of intense local colour was nearly all they had in common. Fauvism was never a formal movement; merely a chance and transitory convergence, from 1905 to 1908, of friends, all admirers of He nri Matisse.

The derisive term Fauves, or wild animals, was first applied (and gleefully accepted by the artists) to the pictures painted by Matisse and Andre Derain at Collioure in the summer of 1905. The swimming meridional heat in Matisse's Interior at Collioure is implied by the patchy undulant colours of an hotel room in which one woman, literally flat out, slumps clothed on a bed whilst another seeks fresh air on Matisse's customary balcony overlooking the sea. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Art Notes: The Fauves Invade the Academy
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.