Computer Literacy in Information Studies: A First World/third World Perspective

By Horton, Weldon J. | Computers in Libraries, June 1990 | Go to article overview

Computer Literacy in Information Studies: A First World/third World Perspective


Horton, Weldon J., Computers in Libraries


At the University of Natal's Department Of Information Studies in South Africa, students com from very varied backgrounds and are employed in a variety of drastically different library and information work situations. Students from libraries in developed countries with completely automated systems sit side by side with those from Third World information centers having only a card file for information access.

Course of Studies

The usual pattern of information studies education is the postgraduate Higher Diploma in Information Studies (HDIS, one year), Bachelor of Bibliography - Honors (one year), Master of Information Studies (one year), and the Doctor of Philosophy (two years).

The students entering Information studies at the University of Natal for the first professional degree, the HDIS, come with a Bachelor's degree in various subjects and a wide range of computer literacy. It is the computer literacy of the HDIS students with which we are concerned at this point.

Why Computer Literacy?

Even with unlimited resources, it would be extremely difficult to address in detail all of the needs for computer literacy education in information studies. With limited resources it, becomes a question of addressing these needs in the most efficient manner possible, while taking into consideration the computer literacy skills brought to the educational situation by the student.

In this context the following question has arisen: since many students will go to work in libraries and information centers that do not have any computer facilities, what is the point of their being computer literate?

While it is true that there may be no immediate need for computer literacy, it is also true that these students may need computer literacy in the future when they change jobs. If students are computer literate, they understand the value of computers in information work, and can intelligently PrOmote arguments for the addition of computers where they are not currently available.

Finally, and possibly most importantly, it is virtually impossible to understand any modem techniques of information manipulation without being computer literate.

Introductory Short Course

The computer literacy of the students ranges from expert knowledge of programming to not knowing what a computer is. This Presented the problem of designing a short course that would not bore the expert or overwhelm the novice.

The solution was to use the universitY's local area network (LAN) as a teaching tool and include applications of immediate personal benefit to the students as teaching examples. Even the experts would be exposed to new material in learning how the network operated and would be able, if they wished, to explore additional areas of the network while the novices were working in required basic areas.

As an alternative, the advanced students could help the novices with th, required basic work. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Computer Literacy in Information Studies: A First World/third World Perspective
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.