Officials Cite Al Qaeda Presence in Kashmir; Say Radio Intercepts Indicate Men Hiding in Border areas.(WORLD)

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), September 27, 2002 | Go to article overview

Officials Cite Al Qaeda Presence in Kashmir; Say Radio Intercepts Indicate Men Hiding in Border areas.(WORLD)


Byline: Shaikh Azizur Rahman, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

JAMMU, India - Indian military officials say they have intercepted communications that indicate al Qaeda and Taliban fighters have entered Indian-controlled Kashmir from across the border with Pakistan-based militants.

The Indian army's Northern Command in Jammu, the winter capital of Jammu and Kashmir state, said it intercepted a radio message believed to be part of an instruction to militant groups operating in Kashmir from their high command across the border.

The message, which was intercepted earlier this month and released to a group of reporters on Saturday, read: "We are sending five new colleagues towards your area. Let them join the old commandos. They belong to Rawalpindi [a city in Pakistan]. Send two al Qaeda colleagues who are with you towards our side along with the driver [guide]."

In Srinagar, the summer capital of the state, a senior army commander who requested anonymity also affirmed the presence of al Qaeda men in Kashmir valley.

"We cannot tell the exact number of those cadres here. But from the radio intercepts we are dead sure al Qaeda cadres are around, and they are hiding in the Indian border districts," he said.

"From surrendered terrorists we knew that last month 75 al Qaeda cadres were on transit at a Hizb-ul-Mujahideen camp in [Pakistan-occupied Kashmir] awaiting orders to infiltrate into India," he added.

An army official in the border town of Rajouri said another intercepted message indicated that an accident in a militant camp in Pakistan last month killed several young recruits being trained in explosive attacks. Two al Qaeda men were among the scores injured in the incident, the official said.

The spokesman at the Pakistani Embassy in Washington denied India's accusations of al Qaeda infiltration into Kashmir.

"These allegations are baseless and are consistent with the pattern of misinformation by India," Asad Hayauddin said.

He said some al Qaeda fighters escaping from Afghanistan have entered Pakistan and are believed to be moving south toward Karachi and other cities.

However, Pakistan has no evidence that the fighters have moved to Pakistan-controlled Kashmir, he added.

Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld said during a visit to India in June that al Qaeda militants were operating in Kashmir, but he softened that comment a day later in Pakistan.

"The United States does not have evidence of al Qaeda in Kashmir," he said after meeting Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf in Islamabad.

"We do have a good deal of scraps of intelligence that come in from people who say they believe al Qaeda are in Kashmir, or are in various locations," he said. "It tends to be speculative, it is not actionable, it is not verifiable."

"The cooperation between the United States and Pakistan is so close ... that if there happened to be any actionable intelligence as to al Qaeda anywhere in the country, there isn't a doubt in my mind Pakistan would go find them and deal with them," he said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Officials Cite Al Qaeda Presence in Kashmir; Say Radio Intercepts Indicate Men Hiding in Border areas.(WORLD)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.