Florida Court Strikes Down State Funding of Religious Schools, Cites Blaine Amendment. (Voucher Victory!)

Church & State, September 2002 | Go to article overview

Florida Court Strikes Down State Funding of Religious Schools, Cites Blaine Amendment. (Voucher Victory!)


A court in Florida has declared the state's voucher law unconstitutional, calling it a clear violation of a section of the Florida Constitution that bars the diversion of tax money to religious schools.

In an Aug. 5 ruling in a case brought by Americans United and its allies, Circuit Judge P. Kevin Davey of the Second Judicial Circuit, Leon County, found that the Florida Opportunity Scholarship Program (OSP) violates Article I, Section 3 of the Florida Constitution. That provision states, "No revenue of the state or any political subdivision or agency thereof shall ever be taken from the public treasury directly or indirectly in aid of any church, sect or religious denomination or in aid of any sectarian institution."

Wrote Davey in the Holmes v. Bush decision, "The language utilized in this provision is clear and unambiguous. There is scant room for interpretation or parsing.... To construe the statutory scheme of the OSP as not running afoul of Article I, Section 3 would require a strained construction of the Florida Constitution that is not countenanced under the law."

Davey was not persuaded by the state's argument that the money spent through the program does not amount to public support of sectarian education. He noted that OSP funds "distributed to a participating student or their parent (guardian) result in a dollar for dollar reduction in the funds of the public school or school district where the student was assigned. These funds are without question revenue taken from the public treasury' of a political subdivision."

The judge also dismissed arguments that the state aid really goes to parents, not private schools.

"To hold that this two-step payment mechanism avoids the prohibition in Article I, Section 3 would be the functional equivalent of redacting the word `indirectly' from this phrase of the Constitution," Davey observed. "Moreover, such an interpretation would amount to a colossal triumph of form over substance."

Florida's voucher law was approved by the legislature in 1999 after being pushed by Gov. Jeb Bush. Under the plan, state officials rate all public schools with letter grades from A to F, based on student performance on standardized tests. …

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Florida Court Strikes Down State Funding of Religious Schools, Cites Blaine Amendment. (Voucher Victory!)
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