READERS of Britain's Leading Daily Broadsheet Newspapers Are Having to Dig a Little Deeper into Their Pockets

Sunday Business (London, England), October 6, 2002 | Go to article overview

READERS of Britain's Leading Daily Broadsheet Newspapers Are Having to Dig a Little Deeper into Their Pockets


READERS of Britains leading daily broadsheet newspapers are having to dig a little deeper into their pockets. Last month the Daily Telegraph, the largest-selling weekday and Saturday broadsheet title (with an average daily circulation of 1m copies), took the bold step of increasing its cover price by 5p to 55p.

The rise coincided with that of the much smaller (and more vulnerable) Independent, which matched the increase, then held its breath. Within a week, the result was clear: consumers had hardly noticed the increase; sales of both titles remained steady.

So steady, in fact, that Rupert Murdoch decided to call hostilities in the battle of the broadsheets, a battle he triggered in 1993 when he cut the price of the Times from 45p to 30p.

Murdoch successfully lifted the circulation of The Thunderer from 390,000 to 677,500; but the aggressive discount failed to overtake the Telegraph, a dream he has harboured since he bought Times Newspapers 20 years ago.

Last Monday, Murdoch increased the price of the Times by 5p, taking it back to where it was at the outbreak of a price war which is estimated to have taken more than pound sterling1bn (e1.6bn) out of the market in lost revenues.

Newsagents cash registers ker-chinked to the silvery tune of an additional 1.75m 5p coins hitting the tills; the rise will bring an additional pound sterling87,500 (e140,000) per day into a broadsheet market still reeling from the worst advertising recession in living memory.

That slump has left Britains broadsheet publishers battered and bruised. The question they are now asking is: will consumers balk at further rises? Probably not, if the rise is capped at a further 5p. Readers have enjoyed bigger, brighter newspapers at artificially low prices for the best part of a decade.

On Monday, those readers wanting to take in every opinion on the revelation that John Major had an adulterous affair before becoming prime minister could buy all four general news broadsheets for pound sterling2.05 (e3.26), roughly the same price they are happy to spend for a beaker of fancy coffee.

Anyway, readers that are turned away by a modest price increase are unlikely to be those that advertisers are seeking to reach. Newspapers are still dramatically under-priced and we have a long way to go until we get up to commercial prices, says Ivan Fallon, chief executive of Independent News & Media. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

READERS of Britain's Leading Daily Broadsheet Newspapers Are Having to Dig a Little Deeper into Their Pockets
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.