Fela Anikulapo Kuti and Jimmy Cliff

By Santoro, Gene | The Nation, August 13, 1990 | Go to article overview

Fela Anikulapo Kuti and Jimmy Cliff


Santoro, Gene, The Nation


For the fans who packed the Ritz in New York City on June 29, it was a dream double bin: Jimmy Cliff and Fela Anikula Kuti. Cliff, up first, fronted his Oneness Band, a loose and lanky group with a whipsaw guitarist and a fistful of wicked grooves. Though he showcased tunes from his new (and uneven) album, Images (Cliff Sounds and Films; available through Vision Records, 13385 West Dixie Highway, North Miami, FL 33161), he also reached back for hits that warmed the crowd and illustrated reggae history.

Like virtually all the Rasta musicians who started out thirty years ago, Cliff began by copying US. r&b sounds. During the craze of the early 1960s he became one of the first Jamaicans to have an album released in Britain. In 1971when Bob Marley was still almost completely unknown outside Jamaica-Cliff, already internationally famous from touring, starred in The Harder They Come. Based on the adventures of real-life cop killer Vincent Martin, who finally died in an Old West-style gun battle with Jamaican police, the movie cast Cliff as a rude-boy reggae singer who, unable to break into the music biz, turns to the ganja trade and kills a cop. Rapidly becoming a worldwide cult favorite, its political allegory put Cliff-and reggae-on the international map.

Even though he, like virtually all other reggae singers, was eclipsed by Marley, Cliff has cut a number of classic tunes in the past twenty-five years: "Sitting Here in Limbo," "Struggling Man:' "You Can Get It if You Really Want:' "Many Rivers to Cross' " "Wonderful World, Beautiful People:' His voice, high and thin and quavery compared with those of peers like Marley, Peter Tosh, Bunny Wailer and Toots Hibbert, soars and stretches with an appealing waif-like quality over his characteristically busy arrangements. Onstage at the Ritz, he had an easy rapport with the crowd on hardline political tunes like "Pressure" (which urges continuing economic sanctions against South Africa) as well as on gentler ballads like "Rebel in Me."

There is nothing gentle in Fela Anikulapo' Kuti. Serious and focused, Fela is a peculiar late-twentieth-century mix of shaman, politician, ombudsman, activist and musical genius. His concerts are lengthy, irresistible groove-alongs-outside of the Meters and certain of James Brown's backing bands, Fela's Egypt 80 (formerly Afrika 70) probably packs the world's most terrifying collection of beats and the blariest foghorn sax section since the bands that produced New Orleans classics like "Sea Cruise. …

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