Ethics in the Classroom; College Curricula Accentuating Application in All Aspects of life.(NATION)(CULTURE, ET CETERA)

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), October 11, 2002 | Go to article overview

Ethics in the Classroom; College Curricula Accentuating Application in All Aspects of life.(NATION)(CULTURE, ET CETERA)


Byline: Josh Earl, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

High-profile fraud scandals at Enron and WorldCom prompted the business world to relearn a basic lesson this past spring.

Ethics matter.

College students are also getting the message. When John Drexler, a business professor at Oregon State University in Corvallis, decided to hold a one-credit class "The Enron Implosion," he expected some interest.

But not a 420-student stampede. The turnout forced Mr. Drexler to move the class to the school's largest lecture hall. Per-session attendance averaged 550 as listeners soaked up ways to analyze the wrongdoing and ways to act appropriately both on and off the job.

Buoyed, in part, by public interest in the scandals, more and more college programs are getting the message, too, and responding by integrating ethics into their lesson plans. Essays by concerned professors began appearing in the editorial pages of major newspapers.

While educators debate the best way to impart ethics to developing minds, one movement, called "ethics across the curriculum," is generating much of the discussion.

Ethics across the curriculum is an interdisciplinary approach to teaching ethics. It looks to encourage students to apply ethics in everyday situations and emphasizes that ethics come into play in all aspects of life.

Elaine Englehardt, a philosophy professor at Utah Valley State College in Orem, first started the movement more than 15 years ago. What sprouted as one professor's initiative has blossomed into a national phenomenon.

"It's a grass-roots movement that has caught the eye of [college and university] administrators," says Wade Robison, an engineering-ethics professor at the Rochester Institute of Technology and founder of the Society for Ethics Across the Curriculum.

The society, which started in the late '90s, has more than 500 members, according to Mrs. Englehardt. In the last four years, attendance at its conferences nearly quadrupled, and the most recent conference in Gainesville, Fla., drew people from as far away as Australia. Schools ranged from major universities to tiny liberal arts colleges.

Mr. Robison's interest in applied ethics germinated more than a decade ago when a friend asked him for advice. After listening to a lecture on ethical theory, the friend told him: "This isn't helpful. Why are you telling me about [Immanuel] Kant?" Kant was an 18th-century German philosopher.

Mr. Robison started looking for ways to apply ethics to practical situations.

"I found myself without any resources and with no place to turn," he says.

Eventually, he begged and cajoled his way into a class for RIT's senior engineering students. Armed with a basic understanding of the subject, he began teaching ethics to engineering students.

No university has yet completely adopted an ethics-across-the-curriculum approach, which Mr. Robison chalks up to institutional politics.

But professors such as Mr. Drexler are increasingly bringing ethics into the classroom anyway. Despite the popularity of his Enron class, Mr. Drexler says that integrating ethics instruction into the curriculum is preferable to what some call "ghettoizing" ethics in stand-alone courses.

By roping ethics off in one or two classes students are subtly encouraged to think that ethics are limited in application, says Dan Wueste, interim director of the Clemson University Ethics Center in Greenville, S.C.

To combat this, some schools are developing discipline-specific courses such as engineering ethics and business ethics. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Ethics in the Classroom; College Curricula Accentuating Application in All Aspects of life.(NATION)(CULTURE, ET CETERA)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.