Blood for Oil. (Comment)

By Vidal, Gore | The Nation, October 28, 2002 | Go to article overview

Blood for Oil. (Comment)


Vidal, Gore, The Nation


In May 2001, the White House issued a National Energy Policy report, known as the Cheney Report: the state of our national oil reserves. In 2000, half the oil we consumed was imported. By 2020, two-thirds will have to be imported. Where will it come from? Then, coincidentally, if not conspiratorially, 9/11 happened. Might there not be a link between Osama bin Laden and Saddam? Iraqi oil reserves are vast, and ... Worth a try? Worth a war? We'll see.

Nine eleven. A number of odd things started to happen immediately after. War was declared by the Cheney-Bush junta. War on terror. But terror is an abstract noun, not a country as our Constitution pickily insists for a war. But Congress did say that the junta could pursue and bring to justice Osama and his helpers, Al Qaeda and the Taliban. And so there was, finally, a real war with a real country, Afghanistan, where we have now installed as president a former consultant to Union Oil of California (according to Le Monde but denied by Unocal), while another Unocal consultant is our special envoy. Meanwhile, Congress passed the USA Patriot Act abrogating various civil rights, particularly those noted in the First, Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Amendments. …

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