The Royal Treatment A Pet Industry Show in Rosemong Reveals a World of Paw-Sibilities

By Miner, Lisa Friedman | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), October 10, 2002 | Go to article overview

The Royal Treatment A Pet Industry Show in Rosemong Reveals a World of Paw-Sibilities


Miner, Lisa Friedman, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Lisa Friedman Miner Daily Herald Staff Writer

A German shepherd strolls around with a cowboy hat perched on his head. A Chihuahua with attitude pokes his head from the denim snuggle suit his two-legged mama models. A pair of cross-dressing Yorkies snooze in sequined sweaters, waking up long enough to try on a little chenille or show off a rhinestone-studded tiara.

This is a trade show like no other. There are plenty of folks in suits hawking products - everything from fish-tank filters to hamster housing.

Then there's the spectacle.

Pups in flashing saddle bags. Bulldogs trying on boas. Bichons heading out for a quick bathroom break.

Welcome to the H.H. Backer Pet Industry Christmas Trade Show in Rosemont, the perfect place to find a custom-made couch for Bowser, a specially recorded CD for the kitties and that perfect "Soft- Coated Wheaten Terrier Lover" notepad for your fridge.

Pet shop buyers come to scope out the latest - parrot pinatas, portable pooch potties, edible canine Christmas cards. Entrepreneurs, meanwhile, try to lure buyers in.

Look long enough, and there's little you won't find. Cross charms for Christian canines. A "Pup Mitzvah" set for the Jewish ones. Sirloin-flavored gravy for fussy eaters. Aromatherapy for your cat.

Dogs, cats, ferrets are all welcome - provided they're leashed and take potty breaks only in sanctioned spots.

It's important to do a double-take at any snack bowl. The mints, after all, might not really be for you.

We spent a day scouting out the wildest pet products. We chatted with doggie designers, petted a few pups and took a look at the lengths to which we'll go to pamper our pets.

Oh yeah. We bought a doggie notepad, too.

Putting on the dog

Pleather jackets. Fleece booties. Faux-fur wraps. Rhinestone- studded sweaters. The right retailer has it all.

Just ask Max and Valentine, lounging in their sequined Christmas shirts while mommy Barbara Hoch showed off $65 chenille sweaters and other goodies.

A woman stops to have several styles pulled from the shelves. Her mother's poodle loves dressing up, she says.

Hoch believes it. "The dogs think they're going out once you dress them up," says Hoch, who designs the doggie duds for Max's Closet creations.

Max is about to go global. One of his favorite accessories will be featured on "The Osbournes." Sharon Osbourne, apparently, knows style when she sees it.

Max, of course, doesn't look fully dressed until he's donned a tiara, created by Robin Kershner for her company, Fox & Hounds.

"Everyone thinks their dog is a princess," she says. "Rhinestones and dogs seem to make a great combination."

Of course, if you want something less flashy, you can check out the faux pearl leash ($50) and collar ($25) from QT Dog. It's soooo Barbara Bush.

"The dog has to be accessorized properly," explains Jim Heitzenreder of QT Dog.

Evidence of that is everywhere, and you don't have to stop with jewels. You can spike their hair with streaks of colored glitter.

We didn't spot any dogs or cats streaked with Critter Glitter ($6.99), developed by Dr. Dawn Thomas for Veterinarian's Best. But we envision lots of possibilities.

Pink for tea parties. Red for Christmas. Gold for New Year's.

Best of all, we are told, it's non-toxic. Fifi can lick her sparkly pink paws when she wants to dress down.

"You can put it all over your dog's hair," Thomas says. "You can do doggie punk."

No one says the dog has to like it, though.

Have Toto will travel

The tiniest dogs seem to have it made at the show. They ride in totes on wheels. They cuddle in daddy's big strong arms. They even make the rounds in various versions of the snuggle sacks new moms use for newborns. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The Royal Treatment A Pet Industry Show in Rosemong Reveals a World of Paw-Sibilities
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.