Internet Nets Low-Cost Hotel in New York

By Wylie, Judy Babcock | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), October 13, 2002 | Go to article overview

Internet Nets Low-Cost Hotel in New York


Wylie, Judy Babcock, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Judy Babcock Wylie Daily Herald Correspondent

I recently needed to find a hotel room in New York for five nights in late October. My main priority was low price, but I wanted to be in a safe area, above 44th Street. Naturally, I turned to the Net, where between 60 percent and 80 percent of hotel bookings are now being made, depending on what kind of lodging you study.

I was a bit late trying to get a reservation; my trip was only three weeks away, and I was worried about finding something suitable. I started with Google (www.google.com), entering the words hotel, New York City and value.

The first site I checked was www.bestnyhotels.com, which features eight hotels including the Quality Hotel, Hampshire Hotels and Resorts and the Comfort Inn Central Park West. At the Comfort Inn, the price was right ($119 per night, single), the photos looked appealing and I recalled that Arthur Frommer's budget travel site, www.frommers.com, had recommended it in the past. However, no rooms were available on the dates I needed.

On to www.hotels.com, which has a useful grid of many hotels giving location, amenities and prices. The Mayfair at 242 W. 49th St. looked good, and I liked the description of the hotel as a first-class, European-style boutique hotel in the heart of the theater district. I followed the link and found it had a room for all five nights. The price was $119 for the week nights and $139 for weekend nights.

Hotels.com promises the best rate (its slogan is "the best prices for the best places, guaranteed"), but before booking I checked other sites anyway to see if there was a better price. …

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