Suspect Converted to Islam, Sympathized with hijackers.(NATION)

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), October 25, 2002 | Go to article overview

Suspect Converted to Islam, Sympathized with hijackers.(NATION)


Byline: Julia Duin and Larry Witham, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

John Allen Muhammad, the sniper suspect arrested early yesterday, was a convert to Islam who federal sources say sympathized with the September 11 hijackers.

Mr. Muhammad, formerly known as John Allen Williams, was arrested at a rest stop on Interstate 70 at Myersville, Md., along with John Lee Malvo, 17.

Reports said that Mr. Muhammad, 42, converted 17 years ago to the brand of Islam associated with Minister Louis Farrakhan's Nation of Islam. He changed his name a year ago.

Founded in 1931 by Elijah Muhammad as a black separatist group, the Nation of Islam changed course in 1975 to align itself with mainstream Islam, renaming itself the American Muslim Mission. By choosing the same last name as its founder, the sniper suspect may have preferred this less strident version of Islam, said Georgetown University Islamic studies professor John Esposito.

"There's no formal connection we know of to groups like al Qaeda, but his last name is Muhammad," he noted. "I am leery as to what one can say about this. It's the last thing Muslims need right now. This is their worst nightmare."

The present-day Nation of Islam, headed by Mr. Farrakhan, broke with American Muslim Mission and is now based in Chicago. A spokeswoman for the Nation of Islam said it had no connection with Mr. Muhammad.

"We don't know him and we don't know what he's part of," she said.

Police sources said Mr. Muhammad was connected with the Islamic Community Center in Laurel, where he may have served as a guard. He is also said to have put in guard duty during the Million Man March in October 1995.

The Seattle Times described him as "a Muslim convert and former Fort Lewis soldier sympathetic to Islamic terrorists."

The newspaper quoted several federal sources as saying Mr. Muhammad and Mr. Malvo might have been motivated by anti-American sentiments. Both were known to have spoken sympathetically about the September 11 hijackers, the sources said, adding that neither man was believed to be associated with the al Qaeda terrorist network.

No one answered phone calls at the Laurel center yesterday.

American Muslim groups and leaders yesterday quickly distanced themselves from any connection with Mr. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Suspect Converted to Islam, Sympathized with hijackers.(NATION)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.