Varied Motives Inspire runners.(SPORTS)

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), October 26, 2002 | Go to article overview

Varied Motives Inspire runners.(SPORTS)


Byline: Steve Nearman, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

There are plenty of reasons to run a marathon.

Take Retta Feyissa and Tesfaye Taa Amenu. Just a few years ago, Feyissa and Amenu were world-class runners representing Ethiopia in international competitions.

After both were imprisoned and beaten for speaking their minds in a nation filled with political unrest and oppression, Feyissa and Amenu did what they do best: They ran.

In April 2000, the manager of their national sports federation sent them to a marathon in Cleveland, a race the two Army lieutenants started but never finished because they were not in contention. But instead of going back to Ethopia after the marathon, they stayed in Cleveland.

Tomorrow at the 27th Marine Corps Marathon, they plan to show their gratitude to the agency that was instrumental in their adjustment to life in America and, more specifically, Washington.

"We came here because we wanted asylum," said Feyissa, 27, a housekeeper at the District's Morrison Clark Inn. "Catholic Charities of D.C. helped us."

It was actually Amenu's idea to run at Marine Corps, but he said he bruised his right foot in training and asked his friend of five years, Feyissa, to run in his place."In my country, we had a problem with the government," said Feyissa, who was born in the large region called Oromo and made his first trip to the United States in 1998 to run the New York City Marathon. "There was a lot of fighting there."

Once in Cleveland, Feyissa (aka Ratta Hunde) and the 26-year-old Amenu, along with teammate Ratta Nagassa, lived and raced together, going 1-2-3 in the Plain Dealer 5K on May29,2000.

They sought asylum in the District and issued a press release July1 of that year: "We the undersigned are national marathon runners from Ethiopia, which we represent in international competitions with distinction. However, we are sad to issue this urgent appeal to draw the attention of the international community to the tragic situation facing Oromos in Ethiopia.

"Because of the ever-increasing repression against the Oromo people, it is becoming almost impossible for self-respecting Oromos to live a peaceful life in Ethiopia. The persecution of the Oromo by the TPLF minority government is affecting every sector of life. Even in a sector like sports, universally assumed to be free from any type of prejudice, the Oromos are routinely discriminated against and treated as second-class citizens. Tigrean officials, who have neither the capacity nor the experience, staff the Ethiopian Athletic Federation from top to bottom. Oromo athletes who defy the authorities are intimidated and harassed as OLF members, expelled from competition, or sent to the war front. Oromo athletes who refuse to sell their heart and soul to the TPLF regime are leading a life in hell under the daily threat of imprisonment or expulsion from the Federation. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Varied Motives Inspire runners.(SPORTS)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.