20 IMMUNE BOOSTERS; Beat Bugs with Our Guide to Staying Healthy

Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland), October 30, 2002 | Go to article overview

20 IMMUNE BOOSTERS; Beat Bugs with Our Guide to Staying Healthy


Byline: LISA MURPHY/CHATELAINE OCTOBER/PLANET SYNDICATION

THE simplest things may strengthen your body's self-defence system, from a hearty belly laugh to eating a peach in bed.

With winter approaching, the chances are you haven't given much thought to fortifying your body's inner defences against viruses, bacteria and toxins.

However, getting your immune system - an intricate collaboration of organs, cells and chemical messengers - into shape can be easy, energising and fun.

Eating the right foods, for example, may help restore the disease-busting tools nature already gave you.

And you're getting a boost from researchers who are trying to unravel the complexities of your immune system.

The basics are understood well enough: imagine someone with the flu sneezes in your direction. Anti- germ substances in your skin, mouth and nose go to work right away to keep the flu virus from entering your body.

If they fail, the virus may make its way into your body. There, it hijacks your cells in order to reproduce itself.

Now your inner defences kick in. Your spleen and lymph nodes detect the invaders. White blood cells known as T-cells hunt down the virus and kill it if they can.

As backup, B-cells offer the next level of defence. These white blood cells develop and secrete custom- designed antibodies, known as immunoglobins, which bind to and disable intruders.

If you got your flu shot this year, your B-cells will be already programmed to recognise the virus and swiftly incapacitate it, keeping you healthy.

But what else can you do to keep healthy? We asked the experts to interpret the research and offer advice on boosting your system.

AT HOME...

1. Call a friend. Chatting with a pal may trigger positive emotions. When you laugh and confide, you reduce the levels of cortisol in your body, a hormone known to suppress the immune system.

2. Cook some liver and onions. Liver brims with immune-boosting selenium, zinc, magnesium, iron, copper, folic acid and B vitamins.

3. Relax with a crossword puzzle. Activities that stimulate the parts of the brain that handle working memory, judgment and abstract thought may elevate disease-fighting T- cell levels, according to research by Marian Cleeves Diamond of the University of California.

4. Sprinkle flaxseed (linseed) on your cereal or salad. A good source of omega- 3 fatty acids and phytoestrogens, associated with lower rates of cancer and heart disease. Research from the University of Toronto suggests flaxseed may inhibit the growth of breast tumours.

5. Research before you renovate. Harmful chemicals from damp carpets and old lead-based paints may affect immune function.

IN BED...

6. Feed your lover strawberries, raspberries or grapes. Antioxidant vitamins in fruit and vegetables may boost immune function. It works in the lining of the lungs and bolsters immunity by neutralising the chemical cocktail inhaled from exhaust fumes. Just 20 strawberries a day will produce a measurable increase in ellagic acid.

7. Get lots of shut-eye. Your body produces more immune enhancing T-cells when you sleep. If you're not getting eight hours a night, your chances of getting sick increase.

AT THE SHOPS... …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

20 IMMUNE BOOSTERS; Beat Bugs with Our Guide to Staying Healthy
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.