Books Closed on Defunct St. Louis Daily: Final Payments Settle Accounts of Globe-Democrat

By Fitzgerald, Mark | Editor & Publisher, January 26, 1991 | Go to article overview

Books Closed on Defunct St. Louis Daily: Final Payments Settle Accounts of Globe-Democrat


Fitzgerald, Mark, Editor & Publisher


Books closed on defunct St. Louis daily

With the mailing of 385 checks from a Clayton, Mo., law office, the books quietly, and finally, closed on the defunct St. Louis Globe-Democrat.

Curtis L. Mann, the court-appointed trustee for the bankrupt Globe-Democrat, said checks and W-2 income tax forms totaling $1,377,922.25 were mailed Dec. 17 to employees who had worked for the Globe-Democrat during the chaotic 22 months when it had been owned by Jeffrey Gluck.

In February 1984, Gluck took control of the Globe-Democrat after his lobbying of federal antitrust officials virtually forced Newhouse Newspapers to sell him the 134-year-old newspaper rather than fold it. The previous autumn, Newhouse had announced plans to close the paper, which was in a joint operating agreement with Pulitzer Publishing Co.'s St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

If Gluck saved the paper, the newcomer to daily newspaper publishing, who was 32 at the time, also presided over its demise.

Finances were a disaster. By the sweltering summer of 1985, the newspaper which had once sponsored Lindbergh's first solo flight across the Atlantic was so poor it could no longer afford to run its air conditioning.

At the same time, employee checks began bouncing and, by the fall, they often did not appear at all.

In an article in the January issue of the St. Louis Journalism Review, former Globe reporter Lynn Vernhaus tells the story of C.B. Adams, who left his job at a Kansas City trade publication to become editor of the Globe's Sunday Magazine. …

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