'Spread Kapatiran's Message' - Cardinal Sin.(Opinion &Amp; Editorial)

Manila Bulletin, November 2, 2002 | Go to article overview

'Spread Kapatiran's Message' - Cardinal Sin.(Opinion &Amp; Editorial)


JAIME L. Cardinal Sin gave his full support to Kapatiran sa Pangkalahatang Kabutihan, (Kapatiran) to make politics an effective means for integral development for all rather than a tool for the advancement of a privileged few. Kapatiran is a nonviolent political movement for the common good.

In an earlier message

congratulating the officers

and members of Kapatiran,

Cardinal Sin lamented that

'there is now a growing

tendency to eliminate God in

our endeavors. There is room

for everything and everybody

except God.' He warned that

this attitude would not bear

fruits. 'History is our greatest

teacher on this. In vain

do builders labor, if

God is not with them'

The Manila Archbishop endorsed Kapatiran to the Council of the Laity of Manila and directed its president, Dr. Ricardo S.D. Ledesma, "to disseminate their (Kapatiran's) message to our lay organizations and movements in the Archdiocese."

Says the Cardinal: "I have always believed that it is about time for our lay faithful to be more actively involved in socio-political affairs." He referred to Kapatiran as "a group of concerned Catholic laity who wanted to contribute to the social transformation by raising the political awareness and maturity of our people."

In an earlier message congratulating the officers and members of Kapatiran, Cardinal Sin lamented that "there is now a growing tendency to eliminate God in our endeavors. There is room for everything and everybody except God." He warned that this attitude would not bear fruits. "History is our greatest teacher on this. In vain do builders labor, if God is not with them."

He told Kapatiran: "We recognize you as a collaborator so that the world may know and uphold what is good, true and right. We must join hands so that our nation may journey toward authentic peace, prosperity and joy. We are one with you."

The Cardinal's message was in response to the letter he received from Kapatiran, an organization composed of ordinary citizens and ordinary lay faithful "who can no longer sit idly by while they see the betrayal of public trust by elected and appointed public officials, man's inhumanity to man, the poor and the marginalized exploited by unscrupulous politicians to promote their selfish ends, the deterioration of public and private morality, high crime rates and increased corruption in government, and who want to put an end to dirty politics."

The lay faithful's participation was also in response to the call of the Second Plenary Council of the Philippines "to participate actively and lead in the renewing of politics in accordance with the values of the Good News of Jesus. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

'Spread Kapatiran's Message' - Cardinal Sin.(Opinion &Amp; Editorial)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.