From the Editors

Feminist Collections: A Quarterly of Women's Studies Resources, Summer 2002 | Go to article overview

From the Editors


Summer 2002. Already (writing this in early Fall), summer seems so long ago! Back then, though, I rediscovered the joys of riding a bicycle (a secondhand three-speed with big baskets) and swimming in clear lakes. Here at work I saw an issue of FC to press, got inspired about "zines" (see M.L. Fraser's article in this issue about these fringe-feminist productions), and thoroughly enjoyed supervising a summer internship for a student assistant who might be interested in an editing career. Caroline Vantine--whose own editorial follows--has been a huge asset to many projects in our office for the past year and a half, and it was rewarding to introduce her to the complexities of manuscript copyediting and the whole publication process for this journal--and no small bonus that she can translate French and has an eagle eye for typos and spacing errors!

JoAnne Lehman

Having contributed to the editing of this issue as part of an internship, I now have the pleasure of briefly introducing myself to you.

The first time I heard about women's studies was when I'arrived here as a student at the University of Wisconsin--Madison. Formerly, I had naively believed that men and women had the same status in society. I grew up in Dijon, France, where both my parents worked full-time. But my mother was always the one to make important decisions for the family and household, earn a better salary, and discipline my older brother and me. She also encouraged us to be ambitious and to bravely face barriers imposed by society. In other words, I was raised in a world where women were strong and determined.

Almost as soon as I began to talk, I also pretended to speak other languages, imagining myself as a translator for famous foreign stars. When I was a teenager, the United States caught my attention--I do not exactly know why, but my mother swears it is because she was reading about the founding of America during her pregnancy with me! Needless to say, when I entered middle school, English became my favorite subject--I read books in English, watched American movies with subtitles in French, etc. My next goal was to come and live in America. In high school, I spent two consecutive summers with a family outside Boston to improve my speaking skills. After graduating, I spent a year in St. Paul, Minnesota, as an au pair, taking care of three boys. But I still wanted more, and what I needed was to come here as a student. …

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