World Wide Websites. (Computer Talk)

Feminist Collections: A Quarterly of Women's Studies Resources, Summer 2002 | Go to article overview

World Wide Websites. (Computer Talk)


Filmmaker Laurie Kahn-Leavitt and Harvard University's Film Study Center have created an interactive website about how to "do" history that will fascinate and educate the general adult public as well as students at many levels. The aptly named DOHISTORY site, at http://www.dohistory.org/, uses the book A MID WIFE'S TALE, Laurel Thatcher Ulrich's history of the eighteenth-century Maine midwife Martha Ballard, and Kahn-Leavitt's subsequent PBS documentary/drama with the same title as a case study for demonstrating the experience of discovering history through primary sources--including old diaries. public records, and even graveyards. But there's much more here: timelines showing what was going on elsewhere in the young United States while Martha was writing in her diary about local births, weather, rape, and politics; what was being published in the late 1700s about the practice of midwifery; excerpts from the book and clips from the PBS film; information about designing a research project and making a histori cal film; bibliographies on everything from eighteenth-century medicine to sexuality in early America.

DYKEDIVA.COM (located, not surprisingly, at http://www.dykediva.com) advertises itself as "the alternative lesbian site" and offers advice, rants, a sex column, lists of things happening in the Chicago area, and lots of links, some of which lead to instructions for building your own website. The "Diva" who runs the site says this about herself: "...full of contradictions. I especially like playing drums, mountain biking, and just hanging our with friends. I'm also jaded and a cynical bitch, but sometimes a grrl will win my heart. I'm a freakin' sports fanatic and root for the looser Chicago Cubs 'cause I like [W]rigley field where they play. I've actually been out for a very long time, but my folks still don't get it."

Toronto-based EDUCATION WIFE ASSAULT, which maintains an extensive website at http://www.womanabuseprevention.com/html/index.htm, is nor just for "wives" or even just for women; its "Same-Sex Abuse" page discusses abuse in gay male as well as lesbian relationships, and other pages cover child and elder abuse. The organization is very involved in education and referral, has developed a partnership with young women in immigrant and refugee communities, and offers many publications, including a "Crisis Resource Kit."

[FEAS.sup.2]T stands for Feminist Education, Action, Spirituality, Support, & Theaology (defined as "the study of theology in a feminine aspect"), a "Center Without Walls" that was "birthed out of the Women's Spirituality and Eco-Feminist movements." Currently, the Center is offering colloquia and classes in Long Beach, California, with the goal of establishing a degree-granting program in Feminist Spirituality. Website: http://www.spiritualfeast.com

GROOVY ANNIE'S, at http://www.groovyannies.com, offers news, discussion forums, and links, as well as a text-only version that provides clearer information about some things than does the graphics version--for instance, about the site's purpose: "to gather information of interest to Canadian lesbians, or people interested in what was going in the lesbian community in Canada." Among the site's current news items is one about efforts to legalize same-sex marriage in the Maritime provinces.

INTERACTIVE THEATRE.ORG: USING DRAMA TO EDUCATE ON SEXUAL ASSAULT, at http://www.interactivetheatre.org, is the creation of Aaron Propes, who as a high-school student "was prone to many of the myths that go unchallenged with teenage males." As a Syracuse University undergrad, Propes got involved with feminism and rape-prevention theater; after graduating with a women's studies minor, he started an educational interactive troupe in Sr. Paul called (like the Syracuse one after which it was modeled) "every 5 minutes," a reference to a Ntozake Shange poem that describes the frequency of rape.

The website offers lots of information for others interested in starting similar ventures; existing theater groups can also be listed here. …

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