Morris Brown's Financial Aid Practices under Federal Scrutiny. (Noteworthy News)

Black Issues in Higher Education, October 24, 2002 | Go to article overview

Morris Brown's Financial Aid Practices under Federal Scrutiny. (Noteworthy News)


ATLANTA

Federal authorities are investigating the possible misuse of millions of dollars in student financial aid at Morris Brown College, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported late last month. Morris Brown obtained federal grants and loans for students who were ineligible for aid, according to U.S. Department of Education records obtained by the newspaper through the federal Freedom of Information Act.

Morris Brown must repay $5.4 million to the federal government because it hasn't proven the aid went to the right students between 1995 and 2002. It owes more than $1 million to the state. The federal review began in April 2001. A department review during the 2000-2001 school year showed discrepancies that could have led to the school getting $3 million more than it was due. If the state can't justify the discrepancies, it will have to return that money as well.

Records show a Morris Brown employee in January downloaded $8 million in federal aid using the school's computer network without notifying the department.

Most schools access federal funds as they process student aid applications. But Morris Brown had been instructed to ask for federal permission six months before the incident because of its history of mismanaging student aid.

Bishop Frank Cummings, chairman of the trustees board, said the board didn't know of the severity of the school's financial problems. He said he repeatedly asked Dr. Dolores Cross, then the school's president, about them but was told everything was fine.

"When I found out they had drawn that ($8 million) ... I hit the ceiling," Cummings says. After the withdrawal, the department required Morris Brown to provide student loans with its own funds then seek reimbursement--a restriction rarely placed on a college.

The Georgia Student Finance Commission, the state agency overseeing financial aid, received dozens of calls as far back as 1994 from students and parents complaining about financial aid problems at the school. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Morris Brown's Financial Aid Practices under Federal Scrutiny. (Noteworthy News)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.