Writing Scores Lag Fox Valley Schools Consider Ways to Lift Numbers

By Patterson, Jennifer | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), November 13, 2002 | Go to article overview

Writing Scores Lag Fox Valley Schools Consider Ways to Lift Numbers


Patterson, Jennifer, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Jennifer Patterson Daily Herald Staff Writer

Along with reading and 'rithmetic, writing has been a focus of educators since the days of one-room schoolhouses.

Yet school report cards released today show students throughout the Fox Valley and beyond just aren't learning the craft as well as their recent predecessors.

In fact, the 2002 Illinois Standards Achievement Test scores included in those report cards say student writing skills are in something of a downward spiral.

Statewide, composite writing scores at the third-grade level have fallen a total of one point over the last three years to a 21 in 2002.

Fifth-grade students have fallen from 23 in 2000 and 2001 to 21 in 2002, while eighth-grade students also are at a 22 average compared with a 23 in 2000.

In four of seven northern Fox Valley school districts, only one of the three grade levels taking the test showed improvement since 2000. All other groups tested at those districts, some 17, did not improve or declined.

"Everyone is very mystified by the whole writing assessment," said Christine Harris, assistant superintendent for curriculum for Crystal Lake Consolidated School District 47.

"It seems to be that we can have good scores one year, and we can be doing the same thing the next year and the scores will go down."

Some school administrators say the fluctuations could be a function of the subjective nature of the skill and the human aspect of grading.

Others speculate the writing "prompts" used in the test, which change from year to year and student to student, can affect the outcome.

"It's probably a scoring issue," said Lorraine Lid, Huntley Unit District 158's curriculum coordinator. "It could have been the state decided to raise the bar on writing."

Lid said she would be more worried about her district's scores - which increased at the third-grade level but slipped in fifth- and- eighth grade tests - if they deviated from the statewide trend.

State board of education spokesman Lee Milner said state officials also are trying to figure out why the scores generally are sloping downward.

Regardless of the how or why, administrators in many Fox Valley districts are trying to decide what to do about it.

"Nobody likes to see scores that go down," said Craig Sundstedt, director of elementary curriculum and instruction for Community Unit District 300.

"The response is what we do to make our kids read better or write better."

In the Carpentersville-based district, third-grade writing scores were steady with a composite of 22 over the last three years, but fifth- and eighth-grade students didn't fare as well. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Writing Scores Lag Fox Valley Schools Consider Ways to Lift Numbers
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.