NATO's Growth Spurt; New Members, New mission.(OPED)

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), November 20, 2002 | Go to article overview

NATO's Growth Spurt; New Members, New mission.(OPED)


Byline: Helle Dale, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Most people get over their growth spurts in the teen-age years. This week, however, the very mature North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) is set to grow considerably. By week's end, the roster of potential new members may bring the alliance to 26 from the current 19. If the three Baltic countries are included - as they are expected to be, along with Slovenia, Slovakia, Bulgaria and Romania - NATO will even extend beyond the borders of the former Soviet Union.

Tomorrow, heads of government from current and aspiring NATO countries will gather in Prague for one of the most important meetings of the 53-year-old defense alliance. Though the envisioned second round of post-Cold War enlargement of NATO has taken shape with remarkably little controversy, the upcoming meeting will be an existential moment of extraordinary important for the alliance - and by extension for the troubled trans-Atlantic relationship.

In the age of global terrorism, NATO desperately needs new ways to remain relevant, indeed viable. The terrorist attacks against the United States on September 11 - and their aftermath - were a shrill but much-needed wake-up call for NATO planners.

For the first time in the history of the alliance, the members invoked Article 5 of the NATO treaty - promising collective defense of a member under attack - only to find this offer of assistance politely ignored. Instead, the United States went to war in Afghanistan largely on its own. With the capabilities in place and a time frame of mere weeks, Gen. Tommy Franks did not have the time to wait for NATO allies whose force projection abilities were extremely limited anyway.

President Bush goes to Prague with a specific agenda that includes three items. First, there is the enlargement itself. By being included in NATO, these members of the defunct Warsaw Pact become further grounded in European institutions, members of the democratic West. It will bring Europe closer to realizing the vision of a continent that is "whole, free, and at peace," as Mr. Bush promised in Warsaw in the summer of 2001.

Secondly and crucially, there's the job of transforming NATO into the kind of alliance that can strike against the enemy of the future, very possibly far from its own borders. We no longer face the threat of massive armies contending for the Central European plains, the Cold War model of military conflict in Europe. Rather, today, NATO members face common threats deriving from terrorists and state sponsors of terrorism. …

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