Presses Will Change the Paper's Feel but Not Its Mission

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), November 21, 2002 | Go to article overview

Presses Will Change the Paper's Feel but Not Its Mission


Byline: Jim Slusher

Before long, you are going to begin seeing subtle changes in the Daily Herald.

After five years of planning and preparation, we have nearly completed construction of an extraordinary new printing plant in Schaumburg. The two presses at the heart of this $52 million facility will enable us to print papers faster and give us more options for color pictures and color advertising inside the paper. Because they can produce up to 48 pages at a time compared to the 32-page capacity of our current presses, they will help us include more news on the pages with our latest deadlines.

As important as these features are, one other factor has dominated much of our thinking. For, at the same time we are producing more papers faster with more late-breaking information, the pages of those papers also will be narrower. Not by much, but by enough that it can affect how type, pictures and graphic elements look together. And, it certainly will affect how the paper feels to you.

The page you are now reading measures 13.5 inches wide. The narrower pages will be 12.5 inches wide. So, we effectively are trimming about a half-inch from each side of the page, and you will begin noticing the difference within a few weeks.

In early to mid-December, assuming the process continues to go as smoothly as it has so far, we will start producing the Classified section in the narrower width on the new presses. We will continue to transfer sections to the new presses every couple of weeks or so as we test the processes and as the capacity of the presses increases. So, until around mid-March, when the new equipment will produce the entire paper, you will notice some sections of your paper are slightly narrower than others. If we have done our homework well, that is all you will notice at first. Content and basic design will not change much.

When we redesigned the paper in March 2001, we accounted for the narrower page width we knew was coming. We chose a type face and type size and a basic structure for positioning text and graphics that would work well in the new format. So, the readability and look of the paper should remain strong. …

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