Heritage and tourism.(Opinion &Amp; Editorial)

Manila Bulletin, November 27, 2002 | Go to article overview

Heritage and tourism.(Opinion &Amp; Editorial)


LOVE for heritage is a cultural value that is difficult to advocate. Strange because we Filipinos have an incredible inventory of archeological sites - in caves, by river banks, underwater, even in highly urbanized zones like Metro Manila. We also inherited all types of colonial structures built by our forbears during 350 years of Spanish colonization and 50 years of American domination.

We still have 16th century Christian temples, lighthouses, elegant residences, military fortresses, town halls, hospitals, mission schools, public edifices in our registry of historically and culturally significant sites and structures. The UNESCO has declared the Ifugao Rice Terraces and the colonial city of Vigan as heritage sites. Twenty-six Philippine baroque churches have been recognized as treasures by the ICOMOS. Yet, the wrecker's ball has not been retired. Many heritage sites and structures are being needlessly sacrificed for market-driven, high rise real estate development; a lot more are left to decay and crumble beyond adaptive reuse. Then we wonder why the majority of Filipinos do not know their history and why our sense of national identity still remains weak after more than a hundred years.

Tourism seems like an effective tool for raising historical and cultural awareness. Since anything antique, vintage or heritage is considered old and useless, an obstacle to progress, and anti-modern, tourism could show that heritage conservation is a jobgenerating enterprise with a rapid ROI rate. Local government officials, who wanted to latch on to the tourism band wagon, can be encouraged to convert heritage sites, settings and structures into income-generating tourism products and destinations.

While tourism development can show the commercial potentials of culture and heritage, private sector groups like the Heritage Conservation Society (HCS) can raise historical and cultural consciousness and advocate the protection and conservation of our cultural heritage.

The tourism sector is only one of the partners of heritage conservation. In the Philippines. There are many other stakeholders whose own mandates and development plans have to be taken into account. Among the government agencies, the HCS has to work closely with the National Historical Institute, National Commission on Culture and the Arts, the National Museum of the Filipino People and the Housing and Land Use Regulatory Board. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Heritage and tourism.(Opinion &Amp; Editorial)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.