'The Hammer' Strikes: As 'King of the Hill,' House GOP Leader Tom DeLay Could Be Bush's Best Friend-Or His Worst Nightmare

By Fineman, Howard | Newsweek, December 2, 2002 | Go to article overview

'The Hammer' Strikes: As 'King of the Hill,' House GOP Leader Tom DeLay Could Be Bush's Best Friend-Or His Worst Nightmare


Fineman, Howard, Newsweek


Byline: Howard Fineman

George W. Bush is calling Rep. Tom DeLay of Houston more often these days. When he does, he praises the power of DeLay's political machine, which this year featured a get-out-the-vote drive called STOMP that helped win crucial House races for the Republicans. "The president knew we had a ground war going," DeLay told NEWSWEEK. "We kind of congratulated each other." New York media bosses are calling more often to pay homage to the House majority whip. "The culture of the media is changing," he says. "We're trying to get to know each other." Last week Senate GOP leader Trent Lott was especially eager to get in touch. Moderate Republicans were threatening to derail the homeland-security bill over some special-interest amendments that had been slipped in at the last minute. Lott's compromise: to promise to remove the three worst of them next year. To make that stick, he knew, he had to get approval from House Speaker Dennis Hastert and, more important, DeLay. "We agreed to revisit the three provisions," DeLay told NEWSWEEK--slippery language, but just enough to get the deal done.

All of Washington knows DeLay as "The Hammer." But when the Congress returns in January, he will become an entire toolbox--and one that the president will have to handle with care. As the new majority leader (Dick Armey retired), DeLay will control the flow of legislation and committee assignments in the one chamber--the House--that can actually be controlled. (Running the Senate, says Lott, is like trying to haul bullfrogs in a wheelbarrow.) DeLay's former lieutenants (including Hastert) control all key positions, and won all elections last week for new leadership slots. A staunch conservative with an unrivaled, ever-evolving fund-raising machine, DeLay may be the opponent that focuses the mind of confused and rudderless Democrats. He can also be Bush's best friend--guarding the president's right flank, playing the tough legislative cop (think of a domestic Donald Rumsfeld) and blessing final deals. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

'The Hammer' Strikes: As 'King of the Hill,' House GOP Leader Tom DeLay Could Be Bush's Best Friend-Or His Worst Nightmare
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.