U.S. Vintners Hold Names Hostage in Trade dispute.(NATION)

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), November 29, 2002 | Go to article overview

U.S. Vintners Hold Names Hostage in Trade dispute.(NATION)


Byline: Tom Carter, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

U.S. winemakers acknowledge that while it is legal, it is unfair to use the names of European towns and regions - like Champagne, Burgundy and Chablis - to label cheap American-made wines.

But they also accuse the Europeans of erecting unfair trade barriers to keep American wine from European consumers.

What's more, they pledge to continue using the fuss over European names as leverage, until the trade barriers are lifted.

One such barrier involves calling wine-making techniques widely used in the United States either objectionable to European standards and even unsafe - a practice that causes their American counterparts to bristle.

"I am at a complete loss to understand why winemaking practices used in the United States are not acceptable in Europe, except for erecting barriers to trade," said Rob Deford, owner of Boordy Wines in Hydes, Md., and former president of the American Vintners Association.

For example, certain styles of European wines require aging in expensive hand-crafted oak barrels, but enterprising U.S. winemakers have discovered it easier and far less expensive to store the wine in stainless steel vats and add a woody flavor by throwing in a handful of wood chips - to be filtered out when the wine is bottled.

"In the long term, the wine has to be as natural as possible," said Ghislain de Montgolfier, head of Champagne Bollinger in Ay, France. "I try to make the wine my grapes give me. If you use technology, slowly you move away from the natural product to something totally artificial, where you won't even need grapes."

Balderdash, say American vintners.

"Winemaking is a process. Wine is just properly spoiled grapes," said Bill Nelson, vice president of the American Vintners Association, which represents hundreds of large and small U.S. winemakers.

"The French also process their wine - they add sugar to increase the alcohol. They approve of the old technology for minimal changes. We use modern technology to correct some of the imbalances. In Southern France - where it is warm - they want to use these technologies, too," Mr. Nelson said.

For almost 20 years, U.S. trade negotiators have been working with their European counterparts to overcome Europe's non-tariff trade barriers.

Jim Murphy, assistant U.S. trade representative, said that the United States is willing to phase out the use of European place names like Champagne.

"We would forego the use of semi-generic names, but in return, and this is not quid pro quo, it is a negotiation, what will Europe give up to get the names back?" he told a recent conference in Washington on wine, trademark law and intellectual property that was sponsored by the European Institute.

Mr. Murphy said if Europe would agree to "mutual acceptance of oenological practices," end or reduce export subsidies, phase out domestic supports for its growers and producers, and protect U.S. names abroad, "the U.S. industry has concluded that, 'yes' they'd be willing" to relinquish the use of European names."

The European Union has taken the position that high-tech U.S. wines may be a health hazard, but has also permitted them to be sold in Europe on a temporary, but renewable basis. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

U.S. Vintners Hold Names Hostage in Trade dispute.(NATION)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.