Look out for Local Bodies. (Opinion / Economics)

By Edlin, Bob | New Zealand Management, November 2002 | Go to article overview

Look out for Local Bodies. (Opinion / Economics)


Edlin, Bob, New Zealand Management


When United Future MP Larry Baldock offered "a radical solution" to the growing problem of funding the construction and maintenance of local roads throughout the country, he was mindful that the Government is shifting more and more costs for public goods and services from taxpayers to ratepayers.

Baldock is his party's transport spokesman and favours changing Government policy so that all revenue from roading-related taxes is used on road-related expenditure, an arrangement he reckons would address both roading needs and concerns with the Local Government Bill.

According to Baldock, the Government road funding agency, Transfund, currently pays local councils around 40 to 45 percent of the costs of local road construction and maintenance, about $322 million in the 2002/03 financial year. If the Government adjusted this percentage by five to 10 percent a year over the next five years, he proposed, local councils would have additional income (or at least a greater percentage reimbursement from their local road costs) that should enable them to keep rate increases to zero or at least level with inflation.

The merits or otherwise of Baldock's ideas about the funding of our roads is not the point of this column, however. Your columnist was more interested in noting (a) he is a brand-new member of Parliament and (b) he is sitting on the Local Government and Environment Select Committee.

This committee has been considering public submissions on the Local Government Bill, a piece of legislation with far-reaching economic and constitutional implications. Essentially, the Bill aims to increase the powers and broaden the ambit of local government without providing effective checks on what those authorities may do. At least, not effective enough to satisfy critics of the legislation, such as the Local Government Forum.

The forum, representing Federated Farmers, the Business Roundtable, the Forest Owners Association, Business New Zealand and the Property Council, had cause to be bothered not only by the Bill's broad sweep, but also about the select committee's grasp of the issues. Public submissions on the legislation were considered earlier this year and the committee was still assessing them when Prime Minister Helen Clark called an early election. The membership of the committee which sat down to continue the assessment after the election was significantly different from the membership which heard the submissions.

The committee agreed to a request from the forum to be allowed to re-state its case and early in October heard again from both the forum and from Local Government New Zealand, which represents the country's local authorities and supports the Bill. …

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