What Price Security? (Editorials)

The Nation, December 16, 2002 | Go to article overview

What Price Security? (Editorials)


Now, here's what the deal's supposed to be: In exchange for greater security you give up certain rights. At least, that's what most Americans tell pollsters they want in the wake of September 11. But if the Homeland Security Act is any indication, under George W. Bush the deal they're getting is: You give up more rights for what may be less security.

The law, which the President signed on November 25, creates a new Department of Homeland Security, which is supposed to coordinate agencies that deal with terrorism. But that's way down the road. "It's going to take years in order to get this department fully integrated," said David Walker, comptroller of the General Accounting Office. And it does nothing to improve intelligence sharing between the FBI and the CIA.

The law already has a checkered provenance. Originally, it was the Democrats' idea, promoted by Senator Joseph Lieberman. While hearings were being held, the White House, fearing it would be left holding the bag for 9/11 intelligence failures, rammed its own version through the House in time to bash Democratic senatorial candidates in the recent election.

When the lame-duck Senate passed it, Bush's thirty-two-page proposal had bloated into a 500-page legislative sausage marbled with pork fat. There was a provision repealing a ban on awarding homeland security contracts to corporations with offshore tax havens and another exempting drug-makers from lawsuits on vaccines, intended to shield Eli Lilly from a rash of suits involving a mercury additive it once made for child vaccines and that was suspected of causing neurological damage or autism.

There are also provisions harmful to the health of our liberties:

* Privacy rights. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

What Price Security? (Editorials)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.