Some Stout Sermons Need a Little salt.(NATION)(PRUDEN ON POLITICS)

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), December 3, 2002 | Go to article overview

Some Stout Sermons Need a Little salt.(NATION)(PRUDEN ON POLITICS)


Byline: Wesley Pruden, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

George W. Bush is first of all a dutiful son. His mama taught him manners, and they show.

He keeps repeating the politically correct mantra, like a schoolboy sent to the blackboard to write it out a hundred times: "Islam is a peaceful religion."

Sometimes the schoolboy actually believes what Teacher tells him to write a hundred times across the blackboard. It's possible that George W. even believes his mantra, but he surely understands, as Winston Churchill famously observed in the darkest days of World War II when good guys had to do bad things and occasionally had to pretend to ignore logic and reality, that sometimes "truth must be protected by a bodyguard of lies."

George W., as the president of the United States in a time of grave national peril, has to say a lot of pretty things that ain't necessarily so. He has on several occasions since September 11 repeated the assertion that Islam is "a faith based upon peace and love and compassion" and a religion committed to "morality and learning and tolerance." We're supposed to think that Muslims are just like the Methodists, only different - the difference between Muhammad and John Wesley being one only of degree.

This exasperates to no end Americans who appreciate straight talk, and who don't see much peace, love, compassion, learning and morality bubbling out of the mosques of Iraq, Iran, Saudi Arabia and points between, including some here in the United States. Whatever tolerance there may be is often disguised, successfully, as contempt and hate.

Some of our most prominent preachers have said so, in blunt and forceful language. Jerry Falwell, who is sometimes a little too blunt for his own good, has said naughty and impolitic things ("Muhammad was a terrorist") about the founder of Islam. So has Franklin Graham, the son of Billy and heir of the best-known Christian evangelist of our time, who called Islam "evil." Pat Robertson warned that "Adolf Hitler was bad, but what the Muslims want to do to the Jews is worse."

President Bush has good and sufficient reasons of realpolitik to distance himself from such sentiments, for not wanting to concede the obvious, that the war on terror is in fact a clash of civilizations. But only last week Pope John Paul II, speaking with the discretion and circumspection of a man with diplomats steeped in carefully calibrated language readily at hand, expressed what sounds like a caution not to expect much of well-meant sentimentality.

"Without renouncing the affirmation of the force of the evangelical message [of the Gospel]," he told students at a pontifical college in Vatican City, "it is an important work in the torn world of today that Christians be men of dialogue and work against the clash of civilizations that at times seems inevitable. …

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