Protections Do Not Extend to Bolo-Wearing Workers

The Register Guard (Eugene, OR), December 1, 2002 | Go to article overview

Protections Do Not Extend to Bolo-Wearing Workers


Byline: On the Job by Bureau of Labor & Industries For The Register-Guard

Q: Our company dress code requires that all salesmen wear a tie. We now have an issue with a particular salesman who has started wearing bolo ties to work. Our written policy doesn't specify that this is prohibited, but we really want our sales staff to wear traditional silk - or at least cloth - ties. Would it be discriminatory to ban bolos?

A: Cowboys haven't attained protected class status under Oregon or federal discrimination laws, so prohibiting the bolo won't infringe on your employee's civil rights. But you might consider amending your policy so that it's more specific.

As an employer, you have the right to set your own dress code. Just be sure that you have a legitimate business reason for your policy and that you apply it in a nondiscriminatory manner.

You can certainly require that receptionists, sales staff and other employees who interact with customers present themselves in a manner consistent with the company image you want to portray. This may include a required uniform, limits on jewelry and visible tattoos, and restrictions on hair length and color (no purple or green, for instance).

In some cases, you may be obligated to make an exception to your dress code, where it would be a reasonable accommodation for an individual with a sincerely held religious belief.

Q: Our policy in the past has been to pay employees for up to eight weeks when they are on jury duty. However, we've been acquired by a larger corporation, and as of next year, we're no longer going to offer paid leave for jury duty. What happens if one of our salaried, exempt employees goes on jury duty?

A: Despite your policy change, you'll have to pay an exempt employee's full weekly salary if he or she is out on jury duty but still works part of the week.

The salary rules for exempt employees generally require you to pay their full day's salary when they work part of a day, and their full week's salary when they work part of a week. Oregon and federal wage regulations permit you to dock an exempt employee's salary only in a few scenarios, including when the exempt employee chooses to take a full day off for personal reasons and in some cases when the exempt employee misses a full day due to illness or disability. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Protections Do Not Extend to Bolo-Wearing Workers
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.