Thurmond Turns 100 amid Banter, Plaudits; South Carolinian Has Served Longer Than Any senator.(NATION)

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), December 6, 2002 | Go to article overview

Thurmond Turns 100 amid Banter, Plaudits; South Carolinian Has Served Longer Than Any senator.(NATION)


Byline: James G. Lakely, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Sen. Strom Thurmond, the oldest and longest-serving senator in American history, was feted with jokes, tributes and tears on his 100th birthday yesterday .

The South Carolina Republican, retiring after 48 years in the Senate, was given a very special gift by his daughter, Julie Whitmer, at the end of the party: news that his first grandchild is on the way.

"I knew you were going to give me what I wanted," said Mr. Thurmond, wiping a tear from his cheek.

"It was wonderful to see Strom react to the news of his grandchild," said Sen. Mike DeWine, Ohio Republican. "It was touching."

Mr. Thurmond's hour-long centenarian celebration was paid for by several private corporations and broadcast nationwide. South Carolina Gov. Jim Hodges declared yesterday "Strom Thurmond Day" in his state.

Former aide Thad Strom began the party, and the comedy, by noting that among the things the famously flirty Mr. Thurmond would never miss are votes on the Senate floor and "the grand opening of a Hooters restaurant."

Mr. Strom said he had "20 years of stories" he could tell about the senator, "and even a few I can actually tell in public."

He recounted a tale from the 1992 Republican National Convention in Houston in which he led Mr. Thurmond out of the Astrodome - but out the wrong side. Not knowing which of about 200 buses in a nearby parking lot would take them back to the Marriott, Mr. Thurmond, then 90 years old, started banging on random doors.

His search proving fruitless, Mr. Thurmond suggested he and his aide start to "just walk in the general direction of the hotel." After a few minutes, said Mr. Strom, they found themselves in a dangerous-looking neighborhood.

A police car approached. The Houston police officer rolled down the window because he recognized Mr. Thurmond.

The senator asked the police officer for a lift to the Marriott. The officer said he woukd be happy to oblige but he had a burly "250-pound prisoner" in the back.

"Senator Thurmond looked into the window, opened the door and said 'Slide over,'" said Mr. Strom. "We pulled him out the car by his coattails."

Senate Republican Leader Trent Lott of Mississippi, who was learning to walk when Mr. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Thurmond Turns 100 amid Banter, Plaudits; South Carolinian Has Served Longer Than Any senator.(NATION)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.