New Pencils and New Crayolas[R]

By Klein, Ralph W. | Currents in Theology and Mission, December 2002 | Go to article overview

New Pencils and New Crayolas[R]


Klein, Ralph W., Currents in Theology and Mission


I write these words at the beginning of another academic year, and I am reminded of different times in my life and in society, when life was simpler, family resources quite limited, and the beginning of the "academic year" in first or second grade was marked by the newness and freshness--and affordableness--of pencils and Crayolas. A lot of "grades" have flown by in the nearly six decades since I forged those memories. This year I bought a new computer instead of the pencils and Crayolas to celebrate the new academic year. September still has that same old magic for me, as it did when Mrs. Colvin was my teacher and knickers my uniform.

Life really was probably not so simple then--people were searching for meaning and striving to be faithful then too, against all the odds. But it seems so much simpler. Back then we stood up to sing the "Battle Hymn of the Reformation." Today we stand up for all the hymns and wouldn't be caught dead talking about the "battle hymn" of the Reformation. Today we assess the positive--and negative--effects of the Reformation on women, discuss issues of sexuality unmentioned then (the fierce sexual debate then was about dancing!), and our country considers toppling militarily the leader of another sovereign state (World War II, at least in retrospect, was a lot simpler ethically).

The first four articles in this issue were delivered at a conference in Germany dealing with the impact of the Reformation on the role of women. Christian Albrecht shows how the role of women after the Reformation was enhanced by a changed legal concept of marriage. While the medieval church encouraged a form of marriage based on mutual consent, the church's stress on the superiority of the celibate life had a devaluating effect on the religious understanding of marriage. Luther argued that the marital relationship between a man and a woman was true chastity and of higher value than monastic asceticism, just as one's daily work represents true worship of God and was to be more highly valued than monastic life with its seclusion. The concept of marriage was grounded in the functions it fulfills; the sacramental view is replaced by a functional view. The pragmatic justification of marriage was to the advantage of those traditionally less privileged in marriage, namely, women.

Christoph Bultmann assesses what the Reformation had to contribute to the relationship of men and women by focusing on Luther's interpretation of Genesis 1-3. He notes that at one time Genesis was understood as the last word on when and how the world was made and on the relation of men and women. He notes that neither opinion should hold sway today. Luther's exegesis reduces woman's role to the bearing and raising of children, and he stresses explicitly the subordination of women in a way that is not counterbalanced even by the aspect of mutual love as it is in Ephesians. Luther's preoccupation with the problem of monastic vows and other similar issues of the day prevented him from fully realizing the consequences of what he himself pointed out in his exposition of passages like 1 Corinthians 7. Hence we need to move beyond Luther's own biased interpretation of Genesis to the biblical text itself to find a more wholesome picture of the role of sexuality in general and of women in particular.

Ute Mennecke-Haustein reviews the positions of Luther and Caritas Pirckheimer in the sixteenth century on why one should leave a convent or remain in a convent. A widow by the name of Ursula Tetzel tried to free her daughter Margarete from a convent where Caritas Pirckheimer was the abbess, and she eventually succeeded with the help of political authorities, who based their opinion on the fourth commandment--the daughter who was a nun should obey her mother. Luther argued that God gave humans an irresistible sexual drive in order to maintain the species and to subdue the flesh so that it does not "rage wherever and however it pleases. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

New Pencils and New Crayolas[R]
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.