Brief Encounters: What to Read as the Holidays Loom? Here's a Quick Guide to Works by Three Masters of Short Fiction. (Bookmarks)

By Bolonik, Kera | The Advocate (The national gay & lesbian newsmagazine), November 26, 2002 | Go to article overview

Brief Encounters: What to Read as the Holidays Loom? Here's a Quick Guide to Works by Three Masters of Short Fiction. (Bookmarks)


Bolonik, Kera, The Advocate (The national gay & lesbian newsmagazine)


Thank heaven for short stories--they provide all the pleasures of a novel, but you can start and finish one before you nod off to sleep. As the holidays crank up to their full frenetic pace and time to read Proust dwindles, here are three of this year's single-author story collections that Advocate readers and their bookish friends mustn't live without.

You Are Not a Stranger Here * By Adam Haslett * Nan A. Talese/ Doubleday * $21.95

A third-year Yale law student, Adam Haslett has done the impossible by garnering critical and commercial success on a debut short-stow collection. A New York Times best-seller after becoming a Today show Book Club selection (handpicked by Jonathan Franzen), Stranger is now a National Book Award finalist to boot. Haslett's stories introduce men and women on the brink of catharsis: A bipolar inventor suffering a manic episode drops in unannounced on his gay son, who's as troubled by the legacy he may have inherited as by his father's illness itself. A newly orphaned high school boy aches with desire for the savage attentions of the class bully. A middle-aged brother and sister share not only a home but a passionate love for a man whose imminent visit dredges up bittersweet memories. Not since Amy Bloom's critically acclaimed debut, Come to Me (1993), has a collection of stories offered such canny psychological insight into the neurotic mind.

The Woman Who Gave Birth to Rabbits * By Emma Donoghue * Harcourt Brace * $24

The prolific Irish novelist, historian, and playwright combines her whimsical humor with erudition to spin 17 fictional fables based on the lives of real historical figures, whether they're famous (art historian John Ruskin), near-famous (Mary Wollstonecraft, mother of the woman who wrote Frankenstein), or little-known characters such as sideshow dwarves, cross-dressers, and spinsters. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Brief Encounters: What to Read as the Holidays Loom? Here's a Quick Guide to Works by Three Masters of Short Fiction. (Bookmarks)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.