Changing Looms: From Factory to Family Home; Property Mail AMID the Blandness of So Much New Housing in Scotland, It Is Refreshing to Find One Project Which Truly Stands out. JENNY SHIELDS Takes a Closer Look at a Family Home Which Has Become an Award-Winner

By Shields, Jenny | Daily Mail (London), December 6, 2002 | Go to article overview

Changing Looms: From Factory to Family Home; Property Mail AMID the Blandness of So Much New Housing in Scotland, It Is Refreshing to Find One Project Which Truly Stands out. JENNY SHIELDS Takes a Closer Look at a Family Home Which Has Become an Award-Winner


Shields, Jenny, Daily Mail (London)


Byline: JENNY SHIELDS

IT is easy to forget - when so much of our built environment looks the same, and homogenised developments spring up from Dumfries to Aberdeen - that there are actually many exciting new architectural projects going on.

The best of these were recognised last month when the winners of one of the country's most prestigious awards, The Saltire Society Housing Design Awards, were announced.

The society was founded in the 1930s to conserve and protect Scots culture and traditions and 'restore the country to its rightful place as a creative force in European civilisation'.

The founders, who were strongly influenced by the work of the celebrated town planner Sir Patrick Geddes, took a close interest in the standard of house design in Scotland.

Keen to encourage buildings which reflected the environment and design traditions, they established the awards in 1937 to identify and publicly commend high- quality housing developments.

Over the past 65 years, while the awards have changed to reflect different economic, technological and political circumstances, the core values of the society remain the same.

Past winners include the Dunbar harbour fishermen's houses from 1951, the tower block in Queen Elizabeth Square, Glasgow, designed in 1964 by Sir Basil Spence and demolished in 1993, and, more recently, Glasgow's Italian Centre.

For some people the only way to ensure they get exactly the sort of home they want is to do it themselves. A stunning example of contemporary self-build design is Cardynet House in the Fife village of Lower Largo.

Created by husband and wife architects Liz and Mike Rolland, it won a commendation from the Saltire Society and scooped a Scottish Design Award in June.

This former net factory was established by the Victorian entrepreneur David Gillies around 1867 in a prime spot right by the shore.

A little later Gillies built himself a villa close to the factory called Cardy House, a property which held a fascination for Mike Rolland since he was a young boy.

Eight years ago, Liz and Mike were looking for a home of their own when Cardy House came on to the market.

They bought it and for a while concentrated on refurbishing the Victorian villa, adding some modern comforts while keeping its period features intact.

It was only when the work was completed that they began to wonder about the potential of the net factory a short distance away.

Mrs Rolland said: 'It was 5,000 sq ft of semi-derelict space which, being listed, meant that it couldn't be demolished.

'We thought long and hard about what we wanted to do with it.

Dividing it into several smaller units seemed a real waste of this fantastic space so we opted for creating one large house.' Work began in 1999 and took about a year. Because it was listed, the couple had to liaise closely with Historic Scotland.

They drew up the plans and, because they lived on site, became their own clerk of works.

The result is a stunning contemporary home with Victorian echoes.

The south elevation, which overlooks the beach, had huge windows installed and a terrace to maximise the views and the light. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Changing Looms: From Factory to Family Home; Property Mail AMID the Blandness of So Much New Housing in Scotland, It Is Refreshing to Find One Project Which Truly Stands out. JENNY SHIELDS Takes a Closer Look at a Family Home Which Has Become an Award-Winner
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.