Early 'Kuryente' Stories in American newspapers.(Opinion &Amp; Editorial)

Manila Bulletin, December 19, 2002 | Go to article overview

Early 'Kuryente' Stories in American newspapers.(Opinion &Amp; Editorial)


THOSE bum stories fed to some newspaper reporters continue to annoy city editors. And displease readers when they find print.

Such hoax news accounts are often tipped off to new or naive reporters by the veterans on the beat - "for the fun of it" - who swallow them hook, line and sinker.

Curiously, the "kuryente" syndrome is contagious. It creeps into the corridors of politics, victimizing not only members of the Cabinet and legislators but even the highest person in the land.

Early accounts of those falsely concocted stories date back to the 1930s carried out by American reporters, and even tolerated by their own newspaper management.

The hard-cover Scoundrels and Scalawags - a Reader's Digest book - contains a number of those narrations.

Competition for readership and circulation, especially among the afternoon and evening tabloids in the United States is the raison d'etre why mock newspaper stories continue to appall not only American newspapers but also the wire services. Local newsrooms are not spared.

Lincoln Steffens of the New York Evening Post and Jacob A. Riis of the Evening Sun were rival police reporters. This was in 1931.

One day bored by an uneventful afternoon covering the police beat, Steffens wrote a "scoop" story about the house of a stock broker that was burglarized.

And, yes, to make the story more sensational and credible, the news item said two policemen who were around the vicinity but were unaware of the break-in even helped the thieves load the stolen items into the van.

Of course, it was a fake police story, it never happened.

Editors of the rival Sun irked for having been "scooped" berated Riis for missing the story. Even the morning papers were reprinting the fabricated beat story.

Riis knew it was a made-up account. So, to retaliate he wrote not only one but three spurious robberies. Also hoax stories. But they made Steffens' innocent editors squirm in their seats by the "exclusive" stories from their rival. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Early 'Kuryente' Stories in American newspapers.(Opinion &Amp; Editorial)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.