Demon Deacons' Davis Versatile, Tough to Tame

The Register Guard (Eugene, OR), December 19, 2002 | Go to article overview

Demon Deacons' Davis Versatile, Tough to Tame


Byline: JEFF SMITH The Register-Guard

Fabian Davis' interests and hobbies off the field are about as versatile as his role on the field for the Wake Forest football team.

The senior has a passion for music, stemming from his childhood days when he played the tuba in the symphonic band and the drums in the marching band.

The history major is considering attending law school or becoming a teacher if the NFL doesn't come calling, which won't be known until after he completes his final year of track and field in the spring.

He enjoys singing, especially smooth R&B tunes, which he'll often do - sometimes rather loudly - before games to help him relax.

And then there are those two pet iguanas in his apartment that have kept away more than a friend or two.

"It's always something different with me and I like it that way," Davis said.

When it comes to the football field, Davis' talents are equally as widespread and the receiver/rusher/returner will no doubt play a major role when Wake Forest meets Oregon in the Seattle Bowl on Dec. 30.

For Davis, it will be his second bowl appearance, but he'll cherish this one more than the 1999 Aloha Bowl when, as a redshirt freshman, he caught one pass for 15 yards in Wake Forest's 23-3 win over Arizona State.

"I appreciate it so much more now, knowing that I have only one game left," Davis said. "Back then, I was just happy to be in Hawaii and having a good time. I'm more focused now. Seattle may not be Hawaii, but it doesn't matter. I'm just glad we're going somewhere."

It's safe to say that without the exploits of Davis, the 6-6 Demon Deacons wouldn't be headed anywhere this month.

Davis is officially a wide receiver who leads the team with 35 catches for 548 yards, but he actually has more carries than receptions. He's often used on end-around reverses and has racked up 43 carries for 381 yards and a touchdown.

He also has returned 16 kickoffs for 352 yards and 34 punts for 320 yards, including one score.

In all, his 1,601 all-purpose yards give him an average of 133.4 yards per game, and the label from coach Jim Grobe as the team's "go-to guy."

"Except when the defense is out there, I don't think he comes off the field," Grobe said. "Certainly he's one of our most valuable kids. …

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