Seasonal Crop

The Register Guard (Eugene, OR), December 22, 2002 | Go to article overview

Seasonal Crop


Byline: SHERRI BURI McDONALD The Register-Guard

AT HARVEST HOUSE Publishers, a Christian book publisher with its headquarters in west Eugene, a hushed serenity descends on the warehouse at Christmastime - and that's just fine by the company's owners and 120 workers.

For the firm's books, decorative plates and other gift items to reach store shelves - and perhaps lie wrapped beneath Christmas trees - by the 25th, the company had to ship out the bulk of its holiday merchandise way back in October.

Like many other companies, Harvest House is feeling the effects of the national economic slowdown.

But unlike other industries that have suffered cuts in revenues and employment, 28-year-old Harvest House is still growing, albeit at a slower pace than in the late 1990s.

In November 2001, Harvest House moved into a spacious 100,640-square-foot building it owns in Greenhill Technology Park.

Harvest House and the shuttered Rosen Products factory are the only tenants in the sprawling park on the north side of Highway 126.

Employment at Harvest House had been growing at 15 percent annually. Harvest House president Bob Hawkins Jr. expects that to slow down to 3 percent to 8 percent.

He predicts that company sales this year will increase 7 percent or 8 percent over last year.

"We're pleased with that," Hawkins said, "given the state of the economy."

The closely held family-owned company doesn't disclose a dollar figure for sales. Harvest House sells about 7 million books a year.

Compared with other industries - and publishing overall - Christian book publishers are still experiencing substantial growth.

Estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau show bookstore sales rose 9.7 percent in 2001, nearly triple the gains in retailing overall, according to the Christian Booksellers Association, based in Colorado Springs, Colo. Sales in adult trade books were down 2.6 percent, but the religious segment saw a gain of 4.7 percent, the association said.

Another strong year

Early indicators show that this Christmas season for Christian books is holding its own, said Kelly Gallagher, vice president of the Evangelical Christian Publisher's Association in Tempe, Ariz.

He predicts that the sector will finish on par with or slightly up from last year.

"All the data we've been able to collect indicate that Christian publishing has typically been doing at least several percentage points better than its secular counterparts," he said.

Lynn Garrett, religion editor for trade magazine Publisher's Weekly, predicts decent holiday book sales across the board because books are such a reasonably priced gift.

Religious books have long been considered recession-proof, with readers turning to books for inspiration and spiritual guidance in both good times and bad.

But Christian book publishers say they are finding that's not necessarily the case anymore.

"Our industry is not seeing the 'recession-proof resilience' we used to enjoy," said Bill Anderson, president of CBA.

"While we may have seen a spiked increase in interest in our products," he said, "terrorist attacks, disappointing Wall Street performance, unemployment, pending layoffs, cutbacks, and recession . …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Seasonal Crop
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.