Manching Revisited

By Sievers, Susanne | Antiquity, December 2002 | Go to article overview

Manching Revisited


Sievers, Susanne, Antiquity


In 1960 Werner Kramer reported in ANTIQUITY on excavations at the oppidum of Manching (Kramer 1960), setting out both the leitmotivs in the history of the oppidum and an overview of the finds. After 40 years, the excavated area of the oppidum (380 ha) has grown by more than 20 ha and the picture of Manching has acquired new colours and shadows. The 1996-1999 excavations, in the northwest of the oppidum, with finds from the 2nd century and the first half of the 1st century Bc, should be at the centre of any overview (FIGURE 1).

[FIGURE 1 OMITTED]

Kramer highlighted the important economic geographical position of Manching, at the point where the Paar flows into the Danube. The convergence of the excavations in 1984-1987 (Maier et al. 1992) and 1996-1999 with an old meander of the Danube, which runs through the oppidum in the north, has now raised the possibility of a Celtic harbour. The most recent investigations (Volkel/Weber in Sievers 2000) show that this meander contained water in Celtic times, with an opening into the Danube, and hence was well suited as a landing place. Hydraulic installations and a concentration of grain stores on the edge of the landing place fit well with these findings.

As well as wood and stones for the construction of the town wall, built around the end of the 2nd century BC, amphoras were unloaded here. These were probably used to transport not only wine but also fish sauces, as attested by a tiny bone from a Mediterranean fish (Manhart in Sievers 1998) which was recovered from a densely populated quarter further south. A concentration of other prestige goods, such as campana and glass dishes, were found here, as well as special weapons such as a dagger, fragments of chain mail or spurs, suggesting the presence of equites. A 62-g lead weight with a divine bust (the second of its kind from Manching (Sievers 2000)) attests to the importance of trade.

Related constructions were laid out along the route of a trackway flanked by trenches. In addition to wells and storage pits, houses, commercial buildings and longhouses, whose function (as stables or magazines) remains unclear, there are unusual types of buildings (quadrangular enclosures with a central structure, Umgangsbau (processional buildings) and hall-like structures) which indicate status or have some cultic significance (Leicht in Sievers 1998). A small bronze hippocampus and a horse's hoof carved from antler horn found near by underscore this impression. The closest parallels for such special structures are found in the `Viereckschanzen'. On the basis of this, it seems that a member of the elite, active in secular as well as religious spheres, resided in the centre of the area excavated in 1996-1999. Here, as throughout the excavation area, scattered human skeletal remains were found, which can no longer be associated with the capture of Manching by the Romans, but should rather be interpreted as connected with a multi-tiered burial practice or as trophy skulls (Lange 1983). However, complete and partial skeletons (FIGURE 2) still raise many questions. The lack of late La Tene burials from large parts of southern Germany makes comparison with other regions of the Celtic world difficult. An interesting find in this connection came, from between a densely inhabited area and the landing place. Although not a burial, it is reminiscent of elite burials from the central Rhein region because of the associated finds: over a burial trench for a body were found remains which could be interpreted as parts of a cart and bronze vessels. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Manching Revisited
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.